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    RESCUING NURSING EDUCATION FROM CONTENT SATURATION

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    krisna

    Posts : 12
    Join date : 2009-06-20

    RESCUING NURSING EDUCATION FROM CONTENT SATURATION

    Post  krisna on Fri 09 Apr 2010, 9:06 am

    University of the East Ramon Magsaysay
    Memorial Medical Center, Inc.
    Quezon City

    Group 2
    Daguasi, Cliff Richard
    Lacanilao, Fatima Grace
    Luis, Mary Ann Krisna
    Mapatac, Tomas III
    Reyes, Ma. Martell


    RESCUING NURSING EDUCATION FROM CONTENT SATURATION: THE CASE FOR A CONCEPT-BASED CURRICULUM

    Jean F. Giddens, PhD, APRN-BC and Debra P. Brady, Phd, RN (2007)

    Health science education is experiencing content saturation because there is more content than can be possibly taught in any given curriculum (Diekelmann 2001). As textbooks become thicker and course content more complex, the students become frustrated because of too much reading, content processing, and memorization. They complain to have reached their limits of grasping ideas. When focus is on content, the volume covered is high, but the retention of information is low because of a failure to accomplish deep learning and understanding.

    Gidden and Brady (2007) enumerated the causes of content saturation and these include information age, changes in health care delivery, teacher-centered pedagogy, content repeti¬tion, and academic-practice gap. They pointed out that if an institution focuses more on theories than application of practice and skills, nursing graduates are still inadequately prepared in the hospital setting.

    A need for a change in the educational practice is being claimed by the Institute of Medicine IOM (2003). One of the reasons is the need for the evolution of knowledge based on the changing needs of the learner. Innovations must be addressed on teaching, and how designing a curriculum promotes learning that is necessary for advancement. Moreover, the National League of Nurses (2003) agreed on a curriculum transformation in nursing education into a more responsive approach to create and shape the future of nursing practice. It must be evidence based and collaborative with integration of new technology.

    Carrieri-Kohlman, Lindsey, and West (2003) defined a con¬ceptual approach as a process that deliberately attempts to examine the nature and substance of nursing from a con¬ceptual perspective. It requires nurse educators to think differently about designing a curriculum and teach differently by implementing student-centered and active learning activities. Conceptual development is a lifelong process because it requires a higher-level of thinking ability.

    Instruction based on conceptual approach is an effective way for students to genuinely understand topics. When teachers base their instruction on concepts, they can expect the students to learn more than just facts. It is an effective way to challenge and prepare nursing stu¬dents to practice their skills in conceptual thinking—which are necessary to respond to a rapidly changing profession and health care environment.

    To conclude, It is essential that learners become critical thinkers and problem solvers, not just memorizers of facts. They need big ideas that they can take with them through their lives so that they will be able to understand complex interactions and become true innovators.

    Guide Questions:
    1. What are the benefits of a concept-based curriculum?

    2. If you will become a future nurse educator, what educational reform will you consider in developing a concept-based curriculum?

    3. In the Philippine setting, what challenges will be faced by schools offering nursing programs if they plan to adopt a concept-based curriculum?

    References:
    Diekelmann, N. (2002). “Too Much Content…” Epistemologies’ Grasp and Nursing Education. Journal of Nursing Education. 2002 Nov;41(11):469-70.

    National League for Nursing (2003). Position Statement: Innovation in Nursing Education: A Call to Reform. Retrieved April 8, 2010 from National League for Nursing Website: http://www.nln.org/aboutnln/positionstatements/innovation.htm

    Institute of Medicine (2003). Health Professions Education: A Bridge to Quality. Washington, DC: National Academic Press

    Carrieri-Kohlman, V., Lindsey, A.M., and West, C.M. (2003). Pathophysiological Phenomena in Nursing: Human Response to Ilness, 3rd ed. Philadelphia: Saunders
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    edyzonmarby10

    Posts : 17
    Join date : 2009-06-21

    Re: RESCUING NURSING EDUCATION FROM CONTENT SATURATION

    Post  edyzonmarby10 on Fri 09 Apr 2010, 12:23 pm

    _____________________________________________________________________________
    RESCUING NURSING EDUCATION FROM CONTENT SATURATION: THE CASE FOR A CONCEPT-BASED CURRICULUM
    Group 3: Juco, Melissa Frances
    Mananquil, Ann Marby
    Marasigan, Iza Therese
    Medalla, Jerrick

    Concepts are ideas that use generalizations and have wide entity. It’s like thinking out of the box. It is timeless, limitless, abstract, and can give you many examples. A school that implements concept-based curriculum produces excellent learners because they are being taught on how to think. Teachers, mentors, professors who based their instruction on concepts could never go wrong in contributing to the society in producing learners who are critical thinkers and problem solvers.
    Teachers may ask “What is…, How is that…., and so on until the class starts to burst their answers. In this way, teachers will know that their students are thinking. When you think out of the box, you don’t limit yourself to a four-walled boundary but rather you think in a way like “sky is the limit”.
    The characteristics of a concept-based curriculum according to Lyn Erickson are:

    -It makes the student think beyond four-walled classroom.
    -When learners keep on thinking in this way, it becomes part of their lives, to think critically and solve problems.
    -It ignites and guides the minds of the learners in making sense.
    -It helps the students to organize their thoughts and gives a greater chance of retaining information rather than just memorization.
    -Information can easily be shared to others because of variety of examples.



    Nursing education has become one of the most complex fields in medicine because of its different aspects of expertise and its need to response on the rapid growing changes of health (Ervin 2006). This has triggered the creation of new curricula.

    A concept-based curriculum is a better way for students to learn. This does not only present facts but enhance and stimulate higher-level of thinking for students. This fosters a deeper understanding for the learner. They see the subject as a big picture before deducing and analyzing the details. In this case, they don’t just memorize the meaning; they are trained to become thinkers and problem solvers. (Moving beyond the page Website. 2010) In this way, learning may be thought of as 'a process by which behaviour changes as a result of --- the learning process that has become task-conscious and formalized' (Rogers, A. 2003).

    As a result, concept-based curriculum can help the students grasp information which can also be retained in their minds for a longer period of time rather than just merely memorizing facts. Most importantly, it is an effective way for students to think more 'scholarly'.


    References:

    1.Rogers, A. (2003) What is the Difference? A new critique of adult learning and teaching, Leicester: NIACE. 85 pages. Short and very helpful exploration of the nature of learning (with particular attention to current debates around informal learning) and the extent to which adult learning and the teaching of adults is the same or different from that of younger persons. Lifted from http://www.infed.org/biblio/b-learn.htm on April 9, 2010

    2. Moving beyond the page 2010. “Home school curriculum for creative hands gifted learners”. Lifted from http://www.homeschoolreviews.com/reviews/curriculum/reviews.aspx?id=441 on April 9. 2010

    3.Erickson, L (2002) “Concept-Based Curriculum and Instruction: Teaching beyond facts “Lifted from http://www.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=Kkv09vcixGsC&oi=fnd&pg=PR7&dq=concept-based+curriculum+and+instruction&ots=YWwhKzGIb-&sig=jkd37YCJ7tdhVf6J3B5Od3gnhNA#v=onepage&q&f=false, on April 9, 2010.

    FELIXAQUINO

    Posts : 4
    Join date : 2010-04-07

    reply for rescuing nursing education from content saturation

    Post  FELIXAQUINO on Fri 09 Apr 2010, 3:20 pm

    University of the East
    RAMON MAGSAYSAY MEMORIAL MEDICAL CENTER
    64 Aurora Boulevard, Brgy. Dona Imelda, Quezon City

    GRADUATE SCHOOL

    GROUP 6
    Aquino, Felix
    Magdael, Kaye
    Sarmiento, Noel
    Vallarta, Aldrin

    Scientific knowledge is expanding exponentially, and healthcare practice is changing rapidly. New challenges in practice include an aging population, a shift from acute to chronic diseases in patients and therefore in treatment models, increasing attention to patient safety and quality of care, and recurrent calls to decrease healthcare costs. The locations of healthcare delivery are moving from hospital to outpatient and community settings, resulting in increased inpatient acuity and diminished availability of traditional clinical teaching sites. Student demographics have also shifted, and new technology offers alternative delivery systems. Meanwhile, nursing curricula are already overloaded, and it is difficult to imagine adding yet more content. Both classroom and clinical teaching systems pose challenges in the current environment. A new system for the integration of these two domains is needed, along with greater support for the transition from education to practice.(Washington Center for Nursing, 2008)

    Demands for skillful and fair-minded thinkers arise today in every professional field and in our civic and personal lives. The pace of change accelerates, multiple sources of information saturate our senses, the rules are rewritten, and problems arise daily that defy predetermined solutions. At a minimum, to be effective learners and successful workers we must be willing and able to make informed, fair-minded, judgments in contexts of relative uncertainty about what to believe and what to do in a wide variety of situations. To go beyond the minimum, workers, learners, and citizens must be willing and able to critique intelligently and amend judiciously the methods, conceptualizations, contexts, evidence, and standards applied in any given problem situation. In short, we must habitually, not just skillfully, engage in critical thinking in a world that is so dynamic that today’s verities are yesterday misconceptions.

    According to Williams (2005), concept-based curriculum and instruction is important for several reasons. The type of thinking required by students to be successful in the 21st century extends beyond rote memorization of facts to higher order critical thinking. A curriculum organized around concepts provides natural categories or organizers for students’ thinking. A concept based approach moves away from low level knowledge and comprehension and encourages deep learning through analysis, synthesis and evaluation. Concept-based instruction necessitates that students assimilate information, as opposed to accumulating it, as required by learning based on facts. Additionally, because information in the world is expanding at a rate far greater than any one person can accumulate it, learning cannot stay fact focused. Education rooted in a concept-based curriculum allows teachers to reduce the number of topics because many topics exemplify the same concepts and conceptual understandings.

    Benefits of Concept-based Curriculum

     Focus on concepts as opposed to content
     Emphasis on recognition of concepts across populations and multiple situations
     Emphasis on interrelationships of concepts
     Fosters conceptual learning
     Stimulates critical thinking
     Meets needs of diverse learners

    At the baccalaureate level, students synthesize information from all previous nursing and general studies courses to initiate interventions that are based upon in depth assessments of individuals, families, groups, and communities. Using this information, they formulate independent, complex decisions that relate to nursing care.

    The student nurse develops intuitive, skillful performance in nursing by first learning the tools of critical thinking, and then routinely applying reflective, critical thought in routine nursing situations. Through this deliberate and disciplined process, student nurses gradually increase their expertise in reasoning as reliable professionals ensuring quality client care.

    The ultimate goal of nursing programs has been to graduate competent practitioners, yet, nursing students at all levels continue to report feeling inept in clinical practice. Nursing students must be taught to use a problem solving approach, since they will be dealing with unanticipated events in their practice.

    Certainly, providing a problem solving context for actively engaging students in the thoughtful application of knowledge is an important variable in increasing learning. Students were required to put a conceptual lens on the problem solving study. Student thinking was forced beyond the facts to the conceptual level as each topic was filtered through the bigger idea.

    References:

    Heather. (2009). The Use of Deliberative Discussion to Enhance the Critical Thinking Abilities of Nursing Students: Retrieved on April 9, 2010 at http//services.bepress.com /cgi/viewcontent .cgi?article=1084&context=jpd: Volume 5, Issue 1 2009 Article 5: Journal of Public Deliberation

    Washington Center for Nursing. (2008). Curriculum Innovation in Nursing Education. Retrieved on April 9, 2010 at http://www.wcnursing.org/master-plan-for-nursing education /Curriculum %20Innovation%20in%20Nursing.pdf

    Williams. (2005). Willow Run Community Schools Concept-Based Curriculum. Retrieved on April 9, 2010 at http://www.wrcs.k12.mi.us /District/Curriculum%20for%20Web/Part %201%20 Email/WRCS%20Curriculum%20Overview.pdf

    krisna

    Posts : 12
    Join date : 2009-06-20

    REPLY TO GROUP 3

    Post  krisna on Fri 09 Apr 2010, 5:41 pm

    edyzonmarby10 wrote:_____________________________________________________________________________
    RESCUING NURSING EDUCATION FROM CONTENT SATURATION: THE CASE FOR A CONCEPT-BASED CURRICULUM
    Group 3: Juco, Melissa Frances
    Mananquil, Ann Marby
    Marasigan, Iza Therese
    Medalla, Jerrick

    Concepts are ideas that use generalizations and have wide entity. It’s like thinking out of the box. It is timeless, limitless, abstract, and can give you many examples. A school that implements concept-based curriculum produces excellent learners because they are being taught on how to think. Teachers, mentors, professors who based their instruction on concepts could never go wrong in contributing to the society in producing learners who are critical thinkers and problem solvers.
    Teachers may ask “What is…, How is that…., and so on until the class starts to burst their answers. In this way, teachers will know that their students are thinking. When you think out of the box, you don’t limit yourself to a four-walled boundary but rather you think in a way like “sky is the limit”.
    The characteristics of a concept-based curriculum according to Lyn Erickson are:

    -It makes the student think beyond four-walled classroom.
    -When learners keep on thinking in this way, it becomes part of their lives, to think critically and solve problems.
    -It ignites and guides the minds of the learners in making sense.
    -It helps the students to organize their thoughts and gives a greater chance of retaining information rather than just memorization.
    -Information can easily be shared to others because of variety of examples.



    Nursing education has become one of the most complex fields in medicine because of its different aspects of expertise and its need to response on the rapid growing changes of health (Ervin 2006). This has triggered the creation of new curricula.

    A concept-based curriculum is a better way for students to learn. This does not only present facts but enhance and stimulate higher-level of thinking for students. This fosters a deeper understanding for the learner. They see the subject as a big picture before deducing and analyzing the details. In this case, they don’t just memorize the meaning; they are trained to become thinkers and problem solvers. (Moving beyond the page Website. 2010) In this way, learning may be thought of as 'a process by which behaviour changes as a result of --- the learning process that has become task-conscious and formalized' (Rogers, A. 2003).

    As a result, concept-based curriculum can help the students grasp information which can also be retained in their minds for a longer period of time rather than just merely memorizing facts. Most importantly, it is an effective way for students to think more 'scholarly'.


    References:

    1.Rogers, A. (2003) What is the Difference? A new critique of adult learning and teaching, Leicester: NIACE. 85 pages. Short and very helpful exploration of the nature of learning (with particular attention to current debates around informal learning) and the extent to which adult learning and the teaching of adults is the same or different from that of younger persons. Lifted from http://www.infed.org/biblio/b-learn.htm on April 9, 2010

    2. Moving beyond the page 2010. “Home school curriculum for creative hands gifted learners”. Lifted from http://www.homeschoolreviews.com/reviews/curriculum/reviews.aspx?id=441 on April 9. 2010

    3.Erickson, L (2002) “Concept-Based Curriculum and Instruction: Teaching beyond facts “Lifted from http://www.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=Kkv09vcixGsC&oi=fnd&pg=PR7&dq=concept-based+curriculum+and+instruction&ots=YWwhKzGIb-&sig=jkd37YCJ7tdhVf6J3B5Od3gnhNA#v=onepage&q&f=false, on April 9, 2010.

    Having a concept-based curriculum will provide opportunities to move towards the adoption of various alternative approaches in a student-centered learning environment. This kind of change may represent a major movement from what most educators are accustomed to do—which is the traditional way of teaching. They teach as they were taught, focusing on what to teach rather than how to teach.

    Christian Jay Facto

    Posts : 10
    Join date : 2009-06-21

    Re:

    Post  Christian Jay Facto on Fri 09 Apr 2010, 5:50 pm

    University of the East
    Ramon Magsaysay Memorial Medical Center, Inc.
    GRADUATE SCHOOL
    Aurora Boulevard, Quezon City


    Alvarez, Efren Jr. F.
    Facto, Christian Jay J.
    Monterozo, Mary Lynn R.
    Nidar, Joy H.


    As the old saying states: “Tell me and I forget, show me and I remember, involve me and I understand. Students or learners should not just be memorizers of facts and information. Facts change, and information is readily available – what’s considered necessary is an understanding of how to get and make sense of the gathered data from different experiences. Further, students need knowledge information that they can apply and utilize through their lives.

    Currently, nursing education is facing a dilemma of content saturation/overload on which there is more content than can be possibly be taught in any given curriculum. The National League for Nursing, (2003) emphasized that as knowledge increases; the amount of content in nursing curricula is becoming more problematic.

    The traditional curriculum is more focus-content, the volume of content covered is high but the retention of information is low because of a failure to accomplish deep learning/deep understanding. Ironside, P.M (2004) accentuated that students just tend to focus on memorizing the content rather than understanding how it should be applied in specific clinical situations.

    Owed to the given dilemma; concept-based curriculum offers a promising medium to bring innovation and transformation in nursing education. According to Giddens, J. (2009), concepts provide organizational structure for the curriculum and courses, it represent the nursing practice and drive contents through selection of exemplars.

    In addition, concept based curriculum is abstract, timeless, broad, and universal. Here, the teachers provides their students numerous activities that ask them to do thought provoking tasks such as explaining, making generalizations and ultimately applying their understandings on their own. The students are expected to learn more than just facts and they must do these things in a thoughtful way, with appropriate feedback to help them do better.

    Other perceived benefits of concept based curriculum includes: (1) Focus on concepts as opposed to content; (2) Emphasis on recognition of concepts across populations and multiple situations; (3) Emphasis on interrelationships of concepts; (4) Fosters conceptual learning; (5) Stimulates critical thinking/ learning; (6) Meets needs of diverse learners; and (7) Nursing focus. (Giddens, J., 2009)

    Common barriers, on the other hand, of implementing focus concept curriculum are: (1) It is different, thus faculty lack understanding; (2) Content ownership; (3) Requires a different level of Organization; (4) No time to change teaching practice; (5) Lack of student preparation; (6) Student reaction / teaching evaluations. (Giddens, J. 2009)

    References:

    Giddens, J. (2009). New Direction in Nursing Education: The Concept Based Curriculum. National Organization for Associate Degree of Nursing. Retrieved April 9, 2010 from https://www.noadn.org/dmdocuments/Plenary_IV.pdf

    Ironside, P.M. (2004). Covering content and teaching thinking: Deconstructing the additive curriculum. Journal of Nursing Education, 43(1), 5-12. Retrieved April 9, 2010

    Ironside, P.M. (2005). Teaching thinking and reaching the limits of memorization: Enacting new pedagogies. Journal of Nursing Education, 44(10), 441-449. Retrieved April 9, 2010

    purplemarge

    Posts : 4
    Join date : 2009-09-24

    REPOSTING REFER FROM ABOVE TOPIC

    Post  purplemarge on Fri 09 Apr 2010, 7:57 pm

    ochona

    Posts: 2
    Join date: 2010-04-06

    *
    * Post n°3

    Re: Topic 4

    Post ochona Today at 8:21 am
    University of the East
    Ramon Magsaysay Memorial Medical Center, Inc.
    GRADUATE SCHOOL
    Aurora Boulevard, Quezon City

    Group 1
    Castellano, Katrina
    Gonzales, Charise
    Galvez, Maria Lourdes
    Ochona, Zacchari Andrei

    Scientific knowledge is expanding every day, and health care practice is changing in an instant. Many students are wide thinkers; they need to picture the idea before analyzing the details. The concept-based curriculum will benefit the student to become wide thinker, problem solver and will not be “kabisote”. As educators focus on big ideas, foster deep learning and understanding through connections and reflections and most of all are consistent (Giddens, 2009).

    Health sciences education is experiencing content saturation; there is more content than can possibly be taught in any given curriculum. The causes of content saturation are advances in the information age; changes in health care delivery; teacher-centered pedagogy and academic-practice gap.

    Curriculum development in nursing education is a creative process intended to produce a unified, meaningful curriculum. The ultimate purpose is to create learning opportunities that will build students professional knowledge and skills so that graduates will practice nursing competently in a changing healthcare environment, thereby contributing to the health and quality of life of those they serve. (Iwasiw, 2008)

    As future nurse educator a reform in a health care delivery setting will be consider in developing a concept-based curriculum because according to (Giddens, 2009) shift in focus from inpatient/acute care to community focused care. Classroom and clinical learning pose difficult challenges in current setting because of lack of facilities and instruments to be used by students while in school.
    As time goes by the population increase, technological advancement people are more conscious of their right to improved health care. So as nurse educator reform of curriculum must evolve every now and then to stay competent (Anyanwu, 2002).

    Anyanwu, J. (2002), Reforms in nursing in Nigeria: the journey so far, department of nursing sciences, faculty of health science and technology, university of Nigeria, enugu campus.
    Giddens, J. (2009), New directions in nursing education: the concept based curriculum.
    Iwasiw C. (2008). Curiculum Deveopment in Nursing Education. Jones and Bartlet Publishers

    arneljamolangue

    Posts : 7
    Join date : 2009-06-21

    Re: RESCUING NURSING EDUCATION FROM CONTENT SATURATION

    Post  arneljamolangue on Fri 09 Apr 2010, 8:34 pm

    University of the East
    RAMON MAGSAYSAY MEMORIAL MEDICAL CENTER
    Graduate School


    AQUINO, Camille
    FADERA, Juan Carlo
    JAMOLANGUE, Arnel
    LACISTE, Chloe Anne


    Concept-based curriculum offers a wider perspective in nursing practice. Concept driven curriculum somehow demands experienced educator. One good example of concept-based curriculum is Proccess-product model-- an interactive and collaborative approach; wherein students and educator make their inputs encouraging for specific topic exploration. It enhances the “commonality of purpose”, or shared vision and “alignment”; or team learning. Collaborative learning, as quoted by Senge, “collectively, we can be more insightful, more intelligent than we can possibly be individually.” As we collaborate and interact, the learner becomes receptive and open to the flow of larger intelligence.
    Activities that we can use to create a concept-based curriculum includes: brainstorming and consensus building. Wherein saturation of information may attain.


    VanTassel-Baska, J. (2003). Effective-curriculumand Instructional models for talented model. Retrieved April 9, 2010, from CINAHL databse
    Senge, P. (2006). The Fifth Discipline: The art and practice of Learning education. New York: Currency-Doubleday.
    Tan, M. (2009). Competency appraisal for Nurses in Fire Crisis responsiveness. Unpubluished

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