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    Discussion Forum 3

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    Admin

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    Join date : 2007-11-15

    Discussion Forum 3

    Post  Admin on Fri 15 Aug 2008, 8:28 am

    Dear Students,

    Thank you for the very enriching sharing in the last two fora. For today, the article on:

    A Three-Tiered Approach to Enhance Undergraduate Education in Bioethics
    -Pinzon, Yvette

    Same guidelines apply. DEADLINE is August 17 at 6AM.

    Good luck!

    Jesson

    yvette

    Posts : 28
    Join date : 2008-08-12

    Re: Discussion Forum 3

    Post  yvette on Sat 16 Aug 2008, 4:23 pm

    Good afternoon everyone.
    I apologize for any shortcomings I'll be encountering during the forum later. I'll try my best and hope for your genuine cooperation for a meaningful discussion.
    Thank you po.

    TITLE: A Three-Tiered Approach to Enhance Undergraduate Education in Bioethics

    According to a survey conducted by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), “little attention and only minimal resources have been directed toward professional ethics” which give rise to this article, introducing a new approach to undergraduate education by consolidating the study of ethics in current curriculum.
    Factors: Curricular resources, Instructors' positive attitude and Government's support
    Approach: Tier1: Introducing the principles
    Tier 2: Integrating Ethics into major courses
    Tier 3: Developing specialized knowledge in ethics

    The goal of this forum is to have a deeper understanding of the article, correlating it with our learned knowledge in instructional design class and eventually taking steps to apply it in our profession.

    A set of guide questions are listed to pave way for our discussion.
    1.What is the emphasis of each tier in relation to our instructional design class?
    2.Cite other factors that may help/hinder the proposed approach in the curriculum.
    3.Name advantages and disadvantages of the approach. How must these be dealt?
    4.In your opinion, will the proposed approach be efficient and effective in the Philippine setting? Will you advocate it in your practice?
    5.What are the implications of the approach?

    Again, I apologize and thank you.

    ~ yvette pinzon


    Last edited by yvette on Sat 16 Aug 2008, 9:38 pm; edited 2 times in total

    silva731

    Posts : 35
    Join date : 2008-08-12

    joel silva

    Post  silva731 on Sat 16 Aug 2008, 5:56 pm

    hi!

    The article is about the systematic integration of ethics into undergraduate programs which is a a key component to improving the understanding of ethical issues in science for a broad audience.They have proposed a three-tiered approach to integrating ethics and social issues that can be readily adapted to particular curricular needs.It is a concerted incorporation of ethics strategically targeted to each level of undergraduate education will improve the preparation of prospective research scientists, enhance K–12 teacher training, increase the scientific and ethical literacy of the general public, and improve the awareness of health professionals regarding ethics in medicine.They examined textbooks, programs, and faculty perspectives,and suggested areas in which changes can be made to incorporate ethics into undergraduate education.

    Including an ethics component in every subject is very important in my own opinion, this will instruct students about being aware of the relevance that biological knowledge has many issues which is of importance to our sociteya and because of this it will help enable students to become better scientist.

    yvette

    Posts : 28
    Join date : 2008-08-12

    Re: Discussion Forum 3

    Post  yvette on Sat 16 Aug 2008, 8:37 pm

    Thank you Mr. Silva for your opinion. I agree that the article as you say is a systematic integration of ethics into the undergraduate programs. Thus, making it a tool in maximizing education. It is like a compass leading to direct students to better comprehension of any addressed issues. As you mentioned, including ethics in every subject is essential. It will not only provide social awareness in relation to the subject but, it may also deepen values and principles to students. Mr. Silva, In lieu to one of the guide questions, I would like to know if you think this approach is being practice in our current educational system and would it be wise to advocate it despite differences in beliefs and culture?

    silva731 wrote:hi!

    The article is about the systematic integration of ethics into undergraduate programs which is a a key component to improving the understanding of ethical issues in science for a broad audience.They have proposed a three-tiered approach to integrating ethics and social issues that can be readily adapted to particular curricular needs.It is a concerted incorporation of ethics strategically targeted to each level of undergraduate education will improve the preparation of prospective research scientists, enhance K–12 teacher training, increase the scientific and ethical literacy of the general public, and improve the awareness of health professionals regarding ethics in medicine.They examined textbooks, programs, and faculty perspectives,and suggested areas in which changes can be made to incorporate ethics into undergraduate education.

    Including an ethics component in every subject is very important in my own opinion, this will instruct students about being aware of the relevance that biological knowledge has many issues which is of importance to our sociteya and because of this it will help enable students to become better scientist.

    Josh

    Posts : 41
    Join date : 2008-08-11

    Re: Discussion Forum 3

    Post  Josh on Sat 16 Aug 2008, 9:23 pm

    The issue of ethics and values against the products of science in relation to sanctity of human life is the core of our discussion. I would like to quote the authors of the article to emphasize assumption above: “Serious consideration of a broad range of ethical issues in science and technology is needed at all levels of education.” However, according to the authors survey conducted to determine the attitudes of genetic professors to the incorporation of ethics into their courses found 93% of instructor devoted less than 5% of class time to ethical issues (less than 7 minutes per week of classes). The reason according to the 95% respondents said that it is because of lack of time.

    The main purpose and emphasis of each tier is to integrate the study of ethics into curriculum without sacrificing the scientific content. To relate it to instructional design, the authors are proposing that as educators we should always consider the ethical value of each instructional materials we produce (Answer to question #1).

    As presented by the outcome of the survey conducted, the lack of time is the greatest challenge for the proposal of the authors. We can also speculate other factors like, the ethical and moral background of the instructors. This simply means that if the teacher has questionable moral background, we can not expect incorporation of ethics on his learning objects or learning contents. There are other factors like, the battle between the scientific relevance vs. ethical relevance. There are great inventions of science that basically abhorred by religion and subject to ethical scrutiny ( e.g. cloning) (answer to question #2).

    For questions numbers 3-5, one advantage if the suggestion will be religiously followed, we can increase morally upright scientists, meaning those scientists that uphold the value of humanity above all else. Disadvantage is the gradual approval of great scientific and high technological breakthroughs since those will be subjected with thorough investigation before it can be allowed for application.

    In Philippine educational system, the suggestion is plausible. I think we are one of those who has great advocacy on integrating ethics as a Christian nation.

    And as nurses, one of our noblest roles is to uphold the sanctity of life, this issue then is a great challenge to us. The rigors of our toxic schedules should not limit us to promote and apply into practice what is morally and highly ethical nursing service. This include us, being students of the MSN executive class, our objective should become better individuals not only focusing on acquiring knowledge and accumulation of credentials, but let us try always to put on wisdom and righteousness, justice and love, that will be highly reflected on the way we think and on how we deal with other people.
    yvette wrote:Good afternoon everyone.
    I apologize for any shortcomings I'll be encountering during the forum later. I'll try my best and hope for your genuine cooperation for a meaningful discussion.
    Thank you po.

    TITLE: A Three-Tiered Approach to Enhance Undergraduate Education in Bioethics

    According to a survey conducted by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), “little attention and only minimal resources have been directed toward professional ethics” which give rise to this article, introducing a new approach to undergraduate education by consolidating the study of ethics in current curriculum.
    Factors: Curricular resources, Instructors' positive attitude and Government's support
    Approach: Tier1: Introducing the principles
    Tier 2: Integrating Ethics into major courses
    Tier 3: Developing specialized knowledge in ethics

    The goal of this forum is to have a deeper understanding of the article, correlating it with our learned knowledge in instructional design class and eventually taking steps to apply it in our profession.

    A set of guide questions are listed to pave way for our discussion.
    1.What is the emphasis of each tier in relation to our instructional design class?
    2.Name advantages and disadvantages of the approach. How must these be dealt?
    3.In your opinion, will the proposed approach be efficient and effective in the Philippine setting? Will you advocate it in your practice?
    4.What are the implications of the approach?

    Again, I apologize and thank you.

    ~ yvette pinzon

    evancarlo

    Posts : 53
    Join date : 2008-08-12

    Re: Discussion Forum 3

    Post  evancarlo on Sat 16 Aug 2008, 10:01 pm



    - As we go through the article, It clearly shows the lack of "good" in life. As we define ethics, it is the right conduct and good life. The article, as it may seem, points out only one thing, "ethics". If were going to ask ourselves, do we use "ethics" in our daily life? This is one thing we can realize after reading the article is the importance of using "ethics" not only on a certain situation but is applicable to all.

    - According to the article, the reason why the approach was introduced bec of the minimal attention given and little resources have been directed towards ethics. Though we can see it;s limitations through several factors such as curricular resources, having the positive mindset and support fore the government, it slowly being grasp by students. As to my understanding, the "TIER" is a systematic approach wherein it slowly introduced the principle of ethics to the undergraduate in accordance to their level (Tier 1 = Introducing the principles). The main objective of tier 1 is to expose the students to new areas where they can learn the fundamentals of ethics and its impact to a certain issue. In this level, they are being trained oon how to act professionally and learn more on the education process.

    - By going to the second level, (Tier 2 = Integrating ethics into major courses), they develop students cognitive learning by sophisticated understanding of the problem and consider the global implications with it. By reaching level 3 (Tier 3 = Developing specialized knowledge in ethics ), they achieved a highler level of learning that they were able to examine ethical topics critically and to relate their knowledge in ethical theory to a wide range of issues that will strengthen the confidence of students, to become a better individual and emerge as leaders.

    - As we look on other aspect that may hinder the approach to be effective is time, it is one of the major disadvantage of the approach by the authors. It will take a longer period for the students to understand the whole concept of ethics and its advantages. As far as an instructor is concern, do we uphold ethical values upon teaching? how about our moral background? These are the factors that i can think of that may hinder the instructor to use the approach in curriculum. That our society may not accept scientifical evidence due to scrutination of certain issue like cloning, mercy killing by religion's sake.

    - As i can say - it is a systematic approach that will let the students to improve their understanding of ethical issues. I'm a little hesitant to say that ethics may bring confusion to people who are culturally diversed. As we know, not every individial understands the reason behind ethics. Some may oppose because of traditions, they're rituals before. As i can see, its not being accepted worldwide due to they're religion and own personal belief. Until now, it is being debated regarding the issue of ethics and in reality. I beleive that this kind of approach is beneficial for filipinos who are open minded and has the "heart" of upholding the sanctity of life. But then again, we have to first identify our own personal beliefs, strength and weakneses, by knowing such will be able to become a better person. For me, it will be one of my standards in practiving nursing professionally. It will hone by belief in life and at the same time, it will further enhanced my knowledge on such issues that may arise "ethically" speaking.

    - For my conclusion, It is very vital for us nurses to uphold ethical values not only to our students but also through our actions towards nursing care. We are the upholding "good life" and to become better individual through the words of god.

    yvette

    Posts : 28
    Join date : 2008-08-12

    Re: Discussion Forum 3

    Post  yvette on Sat 16 Aug 2008, 10:11 pm

    Thank you sir josh.
    indeed, i appreciate your insights.
    I can sense that you are an instructor who has a deep regard in inculcating ethics in your class.
    With regards to your 2nd paragraph, I agree that one hindering factor is the moral and ethical background of the instructor, such it is important to develop self awareness prior involvement in class/activity.
    Your last paragraph tells me that the executive class is made for students to become holistic individuals.


    Last edited by yvette on Sat 16 Aug 2008, 10:14 pm; edited 2 times in total

    luder

    Posts : 42
    Join date : 2008-08-12

    Re: Discussion Forum 3

    Post  luder on Sat 16 Aug 2008, 10:13 pm



    The importance of ethics in education is not a question. we do not want to produce students that act like robots, very capable of performing but has no means of knowing what is right from what is wrong. We can expect that in our everyday lives we will deal with situations that will test our sense of judgment. I do agree with the authors intentions of incorporating ethics into the curriculum. many others think that this is essential. in her article "Now Is the Time for Ethics in Education," Amy Haas (2005) cited Brent Inman, the partner in charge of U.S. recruiting at PricewaterhouseCoopers as saying, “Accounting and ethics are intertwined.” In the same article it was stated that majority of the accouting courses in the US provide inadequate coverage of ethical principles.

    In an essay by Carol Whitback (2005) entitled "Undergraduate Education in Practical Ethics," Case Western Reserve University's engineering program included in their freshman orientation short plays or skits that depicted the dillemas of college life. this is in an effort to trigger the students into thiking of how they live out their lives in the university. Moral responsibilities and academic honesty were being inculcated as early as possible. In the same university seniors students were also tasked to engage in ethics project usually concerning work, graduate or professional school circumstances, whichever was of most interest to them. in a way the students are given a chance to simulate an ethical situation which they might encounter in future. this experience gives them self-confidence in being able to resolve such problems as they proceed in the setting they wish to pursue.

    Carol Whitback's essay portrays a good example on how to integrate ethics into curriculum. but one problem that i can see in doing such is in how deep the students will take the lessons learned to heart. this is probably where instructional design comes in. ethical lessons must constructed in such a way as to really impact the students perception of what should and shouldn't be done either profressionally or personally. and the design must be constructed to provide continuity of the lessons learned for better inculcation throughout the course.

    As a future nurse educator, i would like to incorporate such practices into my would be classes. in my opinion, we are so lacking in ethical principles nowadays because we have lost focus on the direction we want to go. this is true at least for the present generation as i can observe. especially in nursing. we all know at some point that many of our colleagues as well as future colleagues went into nursing not of their own choice. how then can we make them accountable for their actions? i have seen nursing students, some of them i know, who do not take caution in their dealings with patients. and i believe they've already passed the board exam. i can only hope that they have changed their ways and turned for the better, or else...

    It is wonderful to imagine a curriculum that could implement this intervention successfully. to be effective, there should be consistency among the faculty and among the students as well. both must agree to the idea that they will benefit from this practice and the community which they represent as well. again, this is a challenge for instructional designers.

    Amy Haas (2005). "Now Is the Time for Ethics in Education" retrieved Aug16, 2008 from
    http://www.nysscpa.org/cpajournal/2005/605/essentials/p66.htm

    Caroline Whitback (2005). "Undergraduate Education in Practical Ethics" retrieved Aug
    16, 2008 from http://temp.onlineethics.org/edu/cwethed.html


    luder

    Posts : 42
    Join date : 2008-08-12

    Re: Discussion Forum 3

    Post  luder on Sat 16 Aug 2008, 10:28 pm

    i too agree with this idea. but it would be hard to point fingers. the anwer to this may be to have as the first module, for this proposed program, designed for the faculty. self awareness is the key as well as dedication to molding the student the right way as what sir josh is probably doing Very Happy

    yvette wrote:
    With regards to your 2nd paragraph, I agree that one hindering factor is the moral and ethical background of the instructor, such it is important to develop self awareness prior involvement in class/activity.


    luder

    Posts : 42
    Join date : 2008-08-12

    Re: Discussion Forum 3

    Post  luder on Sat 16 Aug 2008, 10:37 pm



    yes, time is of the essence. the only question that i could think about regarding time is "when"? when are we going to start addressing ethical issues in education? particularly in nursing education? It will take time, all the more reason why we shoudn't wait any longer.

    evancarlo wrote:

    - As we look on other aspect that may hinder the approach to be effective is time, it is one of the major disadvantage of the approach by the authors. It will take a longer period for the students to understand the whole concept of ethics and its advantages. As far as an instructor is concern, do we uphold ethical values upon teaching? how about our moral background? These are the factors that i can think of that may hinder the instructor to use the approach in curriculum. That our society may not accept scientifical evidence due to scrutination of certain issue like cloning, mercy killing by religion's sake.


    yvette

    Posts : 28
    Join date : 2008-08-12

    Re: Discussion Forum 3

    Post  yvette on Sat 16 Aug 2008, 10:40 pm

    Thank you sir evan for your reflection.
    Since ethics may bring confusion to people, therefore, I think it is the role of the instructor to be a guide utilizing the proposed approach for example. I agree with you that ethical issues are endless bearing no solutions and there will always be rigid-traditionally bounded people who will contradict this approach in learning.


    Last edited by yvette on Sat 16 Aug 2008, 10:45 pm; edited 3 times in total

    Divinia Joy Tuzon

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    Join date : 2008-08-12

    Re: Discussion Forum 3

    Post  Divinia Joy Tuzon on Sat 16 Aug 2008, 10:42 pm

    Nowadays, students are not that concerned with environmental and ethical issues anymore. Some possible causes include the students’ lack of knowledge about the issues, their belief that the technology today has the answers to the existing problems we are encountering but the most disturbing among all is that students perceive that these issues have no effect to them causing their disinterest to learn. With this alarming reality, though giving importance to the amount of knowledge and skills students should acquire to master their skills, educators should now devote more time as well to stress the importance of ethics in class. This is what the article teaches us.

    Tier 1 is about introducing the principles of ethics to all students regardless of what their major is (or even their course maybe) as early as possible. The first tier of the study focuses on exposing the students at the earliest time possible to fundamental issues which would prepare them to be better professionals. Tier 2 on the other hand is concerned on integrating ethics into the major courses using various teaching methods used by the educators. I believe that this aspect is significant not only in biology courses but all the available courses out there too. The systematic exposure and teaching of ethics in class would ensure that the framework and necessary background needed by the students are provided. Finally Tier 3 focuses on developing specialized knowledge and its application to ethics. The pedagogy used by the educators will have an immense impact on the students’ learning and appreciation of a certain issue. Let me quote what Garrett (2004) mentioned in the article which I truly believe as well, “Giving one such assignment per semester did not detract from the seminar’s content.” From what I have learned from our Instructional Design class, it is absurd to bombard your students with too many requirements and exams. The quantity and complexity of the requirements given to the students will not determine the quality of their learning.

    Definitely, I believe that the proposed approach can be and should be applied in our setting. The curriculum of every school and university should include ethics as an educational component. Not only college students who are focusing on health-rated courses will benefit from this approach but even young children as well who are in their formative years already. For instance, talking about current issues or topics during breaks (in school) or while eating supper (at homes) will show the students the diversity of opinions their friends and families have. This will motivate them to ponder on the issue and may even lead them to reevaluate their thinking after hearing the opinions of others. In this way, they learn to develop their critical thinking in the long run. Integrating ethics in the education of the students will not only enrich their knowledge and values. It will not only make them better professionals in the future but they will also turn out to become socially and morally aware of the issues bugging our society today as early as now. To conclude my comprehension about the article, I realized once again the critical role of the educators in shaping the values and characters of their students. Part of character education is encouraging the acquisition of these habits by offering students effective role models, both in real life and through stories and heroes (Steve, n.d.). Truly, ethical decision making of students is taught and learned throughout the school, but it is also supplemented and practiced by training in reflection, interaction and cooperation with others.

    Steve, J. (n.d.). “An Education in Ethics”. Article retrieved August 16, 2008 from http://www.scu.edu/ethics/publications/iie/v10n1/education.html

    yvette

    Posts : 28
    Join date : 2008-08-12

    Re: Discussion Forum 3

    Post  yvette on Sat 16 Aug 2008, 10:59 pm

    Your suggestion is good sir luder. Though the preparedness of the instructors was inherent in the article, it should be considered in the future proposed programs in curriculum. Indeed, dedication to teach students is a noble act.
    luder wrote: i too agree with this idea. but it would be hard to point fingers. the anwer to this may be to have as the first module, for this proposed program, designed for the faculty. self awareness is the key as well as dedication to molding the student the right way as what sir josh is probably doing Very Happy

    yvette wrote:
    With regards to your 2nd paragraph, I agree that one hindering factor is the moral and ethical background of the instructor, such it is important to develop self awareness prior involvement in class/activity.


    Divinia Joy Tuzon

    Posts : 65
    Join date : 2008-08-12

    Re: Discussion Forum 3

    Post  Divinia Joy Tuzon on Sat 16 Aug 2008, 11:04 pm

    Good point Sir Luther. Addressing ethical issues in education is indeed difficult. Competing with the students for moral authority are their peers and the mass media, which all too often lead our young people in disturbing directions. This is why the partnership of the roles played by the family and the school should be greatly stressed. Steve (n.d.) mentioned that schools have become necessary partners with parents in the race for a balancing influence. Again, I would say that as early as possible, parents should already be molding the values and characters of their children by setting as good role models themselves. Conversely, it is the responsibility of the educator to imbue the importance of ethics to his students the moment they step into his class.


    luder wrote:

    yes, time is of the essence. the only question that i could think about regarding time is "when"? when are we going to start addressing ethical issues in education? particularly in nursing education? It will take time, all the more reason why we shoudn't wait any longer.

    evancarlo wrote:

    - As we look on other aspect that may hinder the approach to be effective is time, it is one of the major disadvantage of the approach by the authors. It will take a longer period for the students to understand the whole concept of ethics and its advantages. As far as an instructor is concern, do we uphold ethical values upon teaching? how about our moral background? These are the factors that i can think of that may hinder the instructor to use the approach in curriculum. That our society may not accept scientifical evidence due to scrutination of certain issue like cloning, mercy killing by religion's sake.


    yvette

    Posts : 28
    Join date : 2008-08-12

    Re: Discussion Forum 3

    Post  yvette on Sat 16 Aug 2008, 11:15 pm

    True. The concept of time has been the hindering factor from the article, and remains at present. There is no reason to wait, the best time to start is now.
    luder wrote:
    yes, time is of the essence. the only question that i could think about regarding time is "when"? when are we going to start addressing ethical issues in education? particularly in nursing education? It will take time, all the more reason why we shoudn't wait any longer.

    evancarlo wrote:

    - As we look on other aspect that may hinder the approach to be effective is time, it is one of the major disadvantage of the approach by the authors. It will take a longer period for the students to understand the whole concept of ethics and its advantages. As far as an instructor is concern, do we uphold ethical values upon teaching? how about our moral background? These are the factors that i can think of that may hinder the instructor to use the approach in curriculum. That our society may not accept scientifical evidence due to scrutination of certain issue like cloning, mercy killing by religion's sake.


    Josh

    Posts : 41
    Join date : 2008-08-11

    Re: Discussion Forum 3

    Post  Josh on Sat 16 Aug 2008, 11:27 pm

    we cannot deny that this challenge confronts everyone of us. There are everyday pressures or stresses left and right that sometimes we fall into set aside what is highly ethically upright actions.maybe we can all agree that our module in Executive class can be one challenge. This might be a test of who will last till the end- "survival of the fittest." and the journal we are discussing is a wake up call, suggesting that in the process of overcoming the challenges we dont sacrifice ethical excellence.[quote="luder"] i too agree with this idea. but it would be hard to point fingers. the anwer to this may be to have as the first module, for this proposed program, designed for the faculty. self awareness is the key as well as dedication to molding the student the right way as what sir josh is probably doing Very Happy

    yvette wrote:
    With regards to your 2nd paragraph, I agree that one hindering factor is the moral and ethical background of the instructor, such it is important to develop self awareness prior involvement in class/activity.

    [/quote]

    Josh

    Posts : 41
    Join date : 2008-08-11

    Re: Discussion Forum 3

    Post  Josh on Sat 16 Aug 2008, 11:36 pm

    Some people might think that time is not an issue, and can argue that those who claim that there is no much time alloted for incorporating ethical issues in instructional materials, are just making alibis. so i would like to ask everyone, is time really a factor? or it is our lack of intention to emphasize on what is morally upright because of hidden personal deisres? i am not pointing fingers, i am just speculating.[quote="yvette"]True. The concept of time has been the hindering factor from the article, and remains at present. There is no reason to wait, the best time to start is now.
    luder wrote:
    yes, time is of the essence. the only question that i could think about regarding time is "when"? when are we going to start addressing ethical issues in education? particularly in nursing education? It will take time, all the more reason why we shoudn't wait any longer.

    evancarlo wrote:

    - As we look on other aspect that may hinder the approach to be effective is time, it is one of the major disadvantage of the approach by the authors. It will take a longer period for the students to understand the whole concept of ethics and its advantages. As far as an instructor is concern, do we uphold ethical values upon teaching? how about our moral background? These are the factors that i can think of that may hinder the instructor to use the approach in curriculum. That our society may not accept scientifical evidence due to scrutination of certain issue like cloning, mercy killing by religion's sake.

    [/quote]

    yvette

    Posts : 28
    Join date : 2008-08-12

    Re: Discussion Forum 3

    Post  yvette on Sat 16 Aug 2008, 11:43 pm

    Thank you sir luder for your additional information (cited articles).
    From your opinion, you have noted that 'many are lacking in ethical principle nowadays' to which I agree, despite the fact that Filipinos as a Christian nation advocates ethics (as sir josh has mentioned in his reflection). The negation lies to the assumption that instructors might have not imparted the knowledge well to the students. Thus, I join your desire to face the challenge. Smile
    luder wrote:

    The importance of ethics in education is not a question. we do not want to produce students that act like robots, very capable of performing but has no means of knowing what is right from what is wrong. We can expect that in our everyday lives we will deal with situations that will test our sense of judgment. I do agree with the authors intentions of incorporating ethics into the curriculum. many others think that this is essential. in her article "Now Is the Time for Ethics in Education," Amy Haas (2005) cited Brent Inman, the partner in charge of U.S. recruiting at PricewaterhouseCoopers as saying, “Accounting and ethics are intertwined.” In the same article it was stated that majority of the accouting courses in the US provide inadequate coverage of ethical principles.

    In an essay by Carol Whitback (2005) entitled "Undergraduate Education in Practical Ethics," Case Western Reserve University's engineering program included in their freshman orientation short plays or skits that depicted the dillemas of college life. this is in an effort to trigger the students into thiking of how they live out their lives in the university. Moral responsibilities and academic honesty were being inculcated as early as possible. In the same university seniors students were also tasked to engage in ethics project usually concerning work, graduate or professional school circumstances, whichever was of most interest to them. in a way the students are given a chance to simulate an ethical situation which they might encounter in future. this experience gives them self-confidence in being able to resolve such problems as they proceed in the setting they wish to pursue.

    Carol Whitback's essay portrays a good example on how to integrate ethics into curriculum. but one problem that i can see in doing such is in how deep the students will take the lessons learned to heart. this is probably where instructional design comes in. ethical lessons must constructed in such a way as to really impact the students perception of what should and shouldn't be done either profressionally or personally. and the design must be constructed to provide continuity of the lessons learned for better inculcation throughout the course.

    As a future nurse educator, i would like to incorporate such practices into my would be classes. in my opinion, we are so lacking in ethical principles nowadays because we have lost focus on the direction we want to go. this is true at least for the present generation as i can observe. especially in nursing. we all know at some point that many of our colleagues as well as future colleagues went into nursing not of their own choice. how then can we make them accountable for their actions? i have seen nursing students, some of them i know, who do not take caution in their dealings with patients. and i believe they've already passed the board exam. i can only hope that they have changed their ways and turned for the better, or else...

    It is wonderful to imagine a curriculum that could implement this intervention successfully. to be effective, there should be consistency among the faculty and among the students as well. both must agree to the idea that they will benefit from this practice and the community which they represent as well. again, this is a challenge for instructional designers.

    Amy Haas (2005). "Now Is the Time for Ethics in Education" retrieved Aug16, 2008 from
    http://www.nysscpa.org/cpajournal/2005/605/essentials/p66.htm

    Caroline Whitback (2005). "Undergraduate Education in Practical Ethics" retrieved Aug
    16, 2008 from http://temp.onlineethics.org/edu/cwethed.html


    Josh

    Posts : 41
    Join date : 2008-08-11

    Re: Discussion Forum 3

    Post  Josh on Sat 16 Aug 2008, 11:55 pm

    In what way then can we face this issue? You are correct sir luder and yvette, that as a Christian nation it is sad to see that some of the educators,and worse, prominent religious figures are seemingly disgracing the name of Christianity. How can we address this matter then, as educators and future leaders?[quote="yvette"]Thank you sir luder for your additional information (cited articles).
    From your opinion, you have noted that 'many are lacking in ethical principle nowadays' to which I agree, despite the fact that Filipinos as a Christian nation advocates ethics (as sir josh has mentioned in his reflection). The negation lies to the assumption that instructors might have not imparted the knowledge well to the students. Thus, I join your desire to face the challenge. Smile
    luder wrote:

    The importance of ethics in education is not a question. we do not want to produce students that act like robots, very capable of performing but has no means of knowing what is right from what is wrong. We can expect that in our everyday lives we will deal with situations that will test our sense of judgment. I do agree with the authors intentions of incorporating ethics into the curriculum. many others think that this is essential. in her article "Now Is the Time for Ethics in Education," Amy Haas (2005) cited Brent Inman, the partner in charge of U.S. recruiting at PricewaterhouseCoopers as saying, “Accounting and ethics are intertwined.” In the same article it was stated that majority of the accouting courses in the US provide inadequate coverage of ethical principles.

    In an essay by Carol Whitback (2005) entitled "Undergraduate Education in Practical Ethics," Case Western Reserve University's engineering program included in their freshman orientation short plays or skits that depicted the dillemas of college life. this is in an effort to trigger the students into thiking of how they live out their lives in the university. Moral responsibilities and academic honesty were being inculcated as early as possible. In the same university seniors students were also tasked to engage in ethics project usually concerning work, graduate or professional school circumstances, whichever was of most interest to them. in a way the students are given a chance to simulate an ethical situation which they might encounter in future. this experience gives them self-confidence in being able to resolve such problems as they proceed in the setting they wish to pursue.

    Carol Whitback's essay portrays a good example on how to integrate ethics into curriculum. but one problem that i can see in doing such is in how deep the students will take the lessons learned to heart. this is probably where instructional design comes in. ethical lessons must constructed in such a way as to really impact the students perception of what should and shouldn't be done either profressionally or personally. and the design must be constructed to provide continuity of the lessons learned for better inculcation throughout the course.

    As a future nurse educator, i would like to incorporate such practices into my would be classes. in my opinion, we are so lacking in ethical principles nowadays because we have lost focus on the direction we want to go. this is true at least for the present generation as i can observe. especially in nursing. we all know at some point that many of our colleagues as well as future colleagues went into nursing not of their own choice. how then can we make them accountable for their actions? i have seen nursing students, some of them i know, who do not take caution in their dealings with patients. and i believe they've already passed the board exam. i can only hope that they have changed their ways and turned for the better, or else...

    It is wonderful to imagine a curriculum that could implement this intervention successfully. to be effective, there should be consistency among the faculty and among the students as well. both must agree to the idea that they will benefit from this practice and the community which they represent as well. again, this is a challenge for instructional designers.

    Amy Haas (2005). "Now Is the Time for Ethics in Education" retrieved Aug16, 2008 from
    http://www.nysscpa.org/cpajournal/2005/605/essentials/p66.htm

    Caroline Whitback (2005). "Undergraduate Education in Practical Ethics" retrieved Aug
    16, 2008 from http://temp.onlineethics.org/edu/cwethed.html

    [/quote]

    ianenguerra

    Posts : 34
    Join date : 2008-06-21
    Age : 34
    Location : Manila

    Re: Discussion Forum 3

    Post  ianenguerra on Sat 16 Aug 2008, 11:58 pm

    Ethics is one of the important things in our daily living. I see it to be essential because it is providing us guidance in every action that we act. As cited in one of the article that I read, the importance of ethics education for health care professionals, including nutritionist and students. The article mentioned that equal importance of using student development theory in the creation of curricula. This focus leads to a curriculum that is empowering to both learner and teacher, assuring that elements of support and challenge are consistently present. This study shows that health care educators are not well-versed in many of education frameworks. In this problem the author suggested the development of resources making these pedagogic principles accessible to health care educators is therefore needed. But the problem seen in the study, that it requires acceptance from the administrator who would willing to support this focus.

    Using a curriculum developed in ethical manner would be an interactive process, so that the curriculum would grow and change based on the needs and responses of students and the overall profession. Establishing ethics as a basis for professional action requires that students and practitioners be constantly exposed to ethical questions and processes for ethical decision making. As the health care arena changes, so too would the issues that would have to be addressed.

    I see that, ethics is one of the vital parts of the values of a person. It will help the person grow, it will help the person to hold his or her action and look after. Ethics must be included in the component of education. As a health care professional it will be useful for us to have our own ethical background so that we can look to our actions.
    Formari, A. Developing an Ethics Curriculum Using Learner-Centered Pedagogy. The Internet Journal of Allied Health Sciences and Practice. Apr 2006, Vol 4 No. 2.

    Divinia Joy Tuzon

    Posts : 65
    Join date : 2008-08-12

    Re: Discussion Forum 3

    Post  Divinia Joy Tuzon on Sun 17 Aug 2008, 12:04 am

    It is true that ethical issues are difficult to address especially if culture is to be considered. It all leads us back to our first discussion forum stressing the importance of self-awareness of the educators. Educators need to recognize and emphasize the essential moral elements already present throughout the curriculum especially through the literature they read, the topics they discuss, the pedagogy they implement, the behaviors they model and reinforce, the relationships they develop, and the virtues they practice everyday. This is why preparing and training students who will be potential educators of the next generation is stressed in the articles we've been reviewing for the past few days. If as early as now students are inspired to integrate ethics into their classes and are already able to appreciate the diversity of culture we have today, they will be capable of raising these awareness and understanding to the general public thus, creating future educators and leaders worthy to be followed and admired.


    Josh wrote:[size=18]In what way then can we face this issue? You are correct sir luder and yvette, that as a Christian nation it is sad to see that some of the educators,and worse, prominent religious figures are seemingly disgracing the name of Christianity. How can we address this matter then, as educators and future leaders

    Josh

    Posts : 41
    Join date : 2008-08-11

    Re: Discussion Forum 3

    Post  Josh on Sun 17 Aug 2008, 12:13 am

    The struggke we have is that, we integrate ethical values in our instructional material or course syllabus, but some learners maybe confused because teachers or people they look up to and expected to practice what they preach are the primary violator-no difference with politicians, how can our learners then practice what we preach to them? Another speculation. Very Happy
    Divinia Joy Tuzon wrote:It is true that ethical issues are difficult to address especially if culture is to be considered. It all leads us back to our first discussion forum stressing the importance of self-awareness of the educators. Educators need to recognize and emphasize the essential moral elements already present throughout the curriculum especially through the literature they read, the topics they discuss, the pedagogy they implement, the behaviors they model and reinforce, the relationships they develop, and the virtues they practice everyday. This is why preparing and training students who will be potential educators of the next generation is stressed in the articles we've been reviewing for the past few days. If as early as now students are inspired to integrate ethics into their classes and are already able to appreciate the diversity of culture we have today, they will be capable of raising these awareness and understanding to the general public thus, creating future educators and leaders worthy to be followed and admired.


    Josh wrote:[size=18]In what way then can we face this issue? You are correct sir luder and yvette, that as a Christian nation it is sad to see that some of the educators,and worse, prominent religious figures are seemingly disgracing the name of Christianity. How can we address this matter then, as educators and future leaders

    yvette

    Posts : 28
    Join date : 2008-08-12

    Re: Discussion Forum 3

    Post  yvette on Sun 17 Aug 2008, 12:24 am

    Good point. It is one of the implications of the article. Instructors who have weak personalities may easily give up or be influenced, without reflecting their own original selves. To include, not only in our executive class as a student that we are challenge, but in our different roles as an individual as well.
    Josh wrote:we cannot deny that this challenge confronts everyone of us. There are everyday pressures or stresses left and right that sometimes we fall into set aside what is highly ethically upright actions.maybe we can all agree that our module in Executive class can be one challenge. This might be a test of who will last till the end- "survival of the fittest." and the journal we are discussing is a wake up call, suggesting that in the process of overcoming the challenges we dont sacrifice ethical excellence.[quote="luder"] i too agree with this idea. but it would be hard to point fingers. the anwer to this may be to have as the first module, for this proposed program, designed for the faculty. self awareness is the key as well as dedication to molding the student the right way as what sir josh is probably doing Very Happy

    yvette wrote:
    With regards to your 2nd paragraph, I agree that one hindering factor is the moral and ethical background of the instructor, such it is important to develop self awareness prior involvement in class/activity.

    [/quote]

    patmarban

    Posts : 38
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    Location : Quezon City

    Re: Discussion Forum 3

    Post  patmarban on Sun 17 Aug 2008, 12:26 am

    Reading the article, “A Three-Tiered Approach to Enhance Undergraduate Education in Bioethics” brings its readers into a new perspective about the importance, or lack thereof, given to bioethics. Based on the article, this concept is, more often than not, put on the “trivial” side of class discussions while theories, facts, and equations were given more emphasis. The article may bring a big positive impact in the Philippine setting due to several reasons, namely: this article is an eye-opener towards the current trend of learning focus, the three-tiered approach is yet to be fully implemented in the local setting, and the article promotes existentialist and intrapersonal learning.

    The authors of the article served as an advocate of the bioethical principles in the undergraduate curriculum. They mentioned in their observations that bioethics was taught with significantly lower emphasis than other subject matters. This new information is an alarming issue knowing that ethics is a vital to decision-making especially in the healthcare field (Aroskar, 1998). Identifying and floating the issue is the first step in change.

    How about in the Philippines? Unfortunately, not all undergraduate healthcare curriculum included bioethics. Ateneo de Davao University’s BS Nursing curriculum, for example, have theology but ethics, specifically bioethics, is not offered in their program. In UERM MSN curriculum, for instance, there is no emphasis on either theology or bioethics. As emphasized by Father Clemente Ignacio in the 2008 Opening Ceremony, the curriculum could have this important subject included for the spiritual development of the students. However, it is also important to note that in the Instructional Design subject, there is introduction of ethics because a module on people management, or how to deal with different attitudes, is embedded. This is a very welcome module dealing with ethics in the workplace. Then again, development of specialized knowledge in ethics is yet to be implemented.

    The use of existentialist and intrapersonal learning approach is suggested by the article. Field trips and reflection, according to the authors, are needed to introduce the concepts to students who may be indifferent. Gardner (as cited in Armstrong, 2000) indicated the need to use at least 3 of the multiple intelligences to facilitate learning. With the three-tiered approach tapping more intelligence, existentialist and intrapersonal, then this may bring a positive implication to the quality of graduates in the Philippines.

    Overall, the three-tiered approach increases ethical awareness of students. The increased awareness will allow them to be more interested to take part in social responsibility, leading towards the totality of a quality graduate.


    REFERENCES:

    Armstrong, T. (2000). Multiple intelligences. Retrieved August 16, 2008 from http://www.thomasarmstrong.com/multiple_intelligences.htm

    Aroscar, M. A. (1998). Administrative ethics: perspectives on patients and community-based care. The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing. Retrieved August 16, 2008, from http://nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/ANAMarketplace/ANAPeriodicals/OJIN/TableofContents/Vol31998/No3Vol31998/AdministrativeEthicsPerspectives.aspx

    Ateneo de Davao. BS Nursing curriculum. Retrieved August 16, 2008 from http://www.addu.edu.ph/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=163

    yvette wrote:
    1.What is the emphasis of each tier in relation to our instructional design class?
    2.Cite other factors that may help/hinder the proposed approach in the curriculum.
    3.Name advantages and disadvantages of the approach. How must these be dealt?
    4.In your opinion, will the proposed approach be efficient and effective in the Philippine setting? Will you advocate it in your practice?
    5.What are the implications of the approach?

    patmarban

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    Re: Discussion Forum 3

    Post  patmarban on Sun 17 Aug 2008, 12:28 am

    I agree with you. The development of a total person not only includes cognitive, but spiritual/ethical as well.

    silva731 wrote:hi!

    The article is about the systematic integration of ethics into undergraduate programs which is a a key component to improving the understanding of ethical issues in science for a broad audience.They have proposed a three-tiered approach to integrating ethics and social issues that can be readily adapted to particular curricular needs.It is a concerted incorporation of ethics strategically targeted to each level of undergraduate education will improve the preparation of prospective research scientists, enhance K–12 teacher training, increase the scientific and ethical literacy of the general public, and improve the awareness of health professionals regarding ethics in medicine.They examined textbooks, programs, and faculty perspectives,and suggested areas in which changes can be made to incorporate ethics into undergraduate education.

    Including an ethics component in every subject is very important in my own opinion, this will instruct students about being aware of the relevance that biological knowledge has many issues which is of importance to our sociteya and because of this it will help enable students to become better scientist.

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