E-learning modules for Integrated Virtual Learning


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    patmarban

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    Post  patmarban on Sun 17 Aug 2008, 12:33 am

    You are correct in saying that if the instructors have a moral background that is not congruent with the ethical principles, then we cannot expect them to prioritize this in their discussions. In turn, students may miss some opportunities to develop their knowledge on ethics.

    Josh wrote:

    As presented by the outcome of the survey conducted, the lack of time is the greatest challenge for the proposal of the authors. We can also speculate other factors like, the ethical and moral background of the instructors. This simply means that if the teacher has questionable moral background, we can not expect incorporation of ethics on his learning objects or learning contents. There are other factors like, the battle between the scientific relevance vs. ethical relevance. There are great inventions of science that basically abhorred by religion and subject to ethical scrutiny ( e.g. cloning) (answer to question #2).

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    Josh

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    Post  Josh on Sun 17 Aug 2008, 12:34 am

    You are correct. as was lectured on us also in this course, our instructional design starts at asking what is the vision/mission of the nstitution? Because from the vision/mission we get the ethical standard of the institution and that our instructional materials should be patterned accordingly.quote="patmarban"]Reading the article, “A Three-Tiered Approach to Enhance Undergraduate Education in Bioethics” brings its readers into a new perspective about the importance, or lack thereof, given to bioethics. Based on the article, this concept is, more often than not, put on the “trivial” side of class discussions while theories, facts, and equations were given more emphasis. The article may bring a big positive impact in the Philippine setting due to several reasons, namely: this article is an eye-opener towards the current trend of learning focus, the three-tiered approach is yet to be fully implemented in the local setting, and the article promotes existentialist and intrapersonal learning.

    The authors of the article served as an advocate of the bioethical principles in the undergraduate curriculum. They mentioned in their observations that bioethics was taught with significantly lower emphasis than other subject matters. This new information is an alarming issue knowing that ethics is a vital to decision-making especially in the healthcare field (Aroskar, 1998). Identifying and floating the issue is the first step in change.

    How about in the Philippines? Unfortunately, not all undergraduate healthcare curriculum included bioethics. Ateneo de Davao University’s BS Nursing curriculum, for example, have theology but ethics, specifically bioethics, is not offered in their program. In UERM MSN curriculum, for instance, there is no emphasis on either theology or bioethics. As emphasized by Father Clemente Ignacio in the 2008 Opening Ceremony, the curriculum could have this important subject included for the spiritual development of the students. However, it is also important to note that in the Instructional Design subject, there is introduction of ethics because a module on people management, or how to deal with different attitudes, is embedded. This is a very welcome module dealing with ethics in the workplace. Then again, development of specialized knowledge in ethics is yet to be implemented.

    The use of existentialist and intrapersonal learning approach is suggested by the article. Field trips and reflection, according to the authors, are needed to introduce the concepts to students who may be indifferent. Gardner (as cited in Armstrong, 2000) indicated the need to use at least 3 of the multiple intelligences to facilitate learning. With the three-tiered approach tapping more intelligence, existentialist and intrapersonal, then this may bring a positive implication to the quality of graduates in the Philippines.

    Overall, the three-tiered approach increases ethical awareness of students. The increased awareness will allow them to be more interested to take part in social responsibility, leading towards the totality of a quality graduate.


    REFERENCES:

    Armstrong, T. (2000). Multiple intelligences. Retrieved August 16, 2008 from http://www.thomasarmstrong.com/multiple_intelligences.htm

    Aroscar, M. A. (1998). Administrative ethics: perspectives on patients and community-based care. The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing. Retrieved August 16, 2008, from http://nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/ANAMarketplace/ANAPeriodicals/OJIN/TableofContents/Vol31998/No3Vol31998/AdministrativeEthicsPerspectives.aspx

    Ateneo de Davao. BS Nursing curriculum. Retrieved August 16, 2008 from http://www.addu.edu.ph/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=163

    yvette wrote:
    1.What is the emphasis of each tier in relation to our instructional design class?
    2.Cite other factors that may help/hinder the proposed approach in the curriculum.
    3.Name advantages and disadvantages of the approach. How must these be dealt?
    4.In your opinion, will the proposed approach be efficient and effective in the Philippine setting? Will you advocate it in your practice?
    5.What are the implications of the approach?
    [/quote]
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    sdlopez02

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    Post  sdlopez02 on Sun 17 Aug 2008, 12:34 am

    I agree with you sir josh. It is true that many people have lost their moral ascendancy to teach others as they have tainted themselves with the very "sin" that they are trying to eradicate. the student could say to that person "do not preach what you cannot practice" (as quoted by St. paul himself). Integrity is what we need in a person who would teach us ethics. But it would be difficult to find such a person especially in this fast paced world where almost everyone is clawing themselves to the top in the expense of hurting others in the process.
    Josh wrote:The struggke we have is that, we integrate ethical values in our instructional material or course syllabus, but some learners maybe confused because teachers or people they look up to and expected to practice what they preach are the primary violator-no difference with politicians, how can our learners then practice what we preach to them? Another speculation. Very Happy
    Divinia Joy Tuzon wrote:It is true that ethical issues are difficult to address especially if culture is to be considered. It all leads us back to our first discussion forum stressing the importance of self-awareness of the educators. Educators need to recognize and emphasize the essential moral elements already present throughout the curriculum especially through the literature they read, the topics they discuss, the pedagogy they implement, the behaviors they model and reinforce, the relationships they develop, and the virtues they practice everyday. This is why preparing and training students who will be potential educators of the next generation is stressed in the articles we've been reviewing for the past few days. If as early as now students are inspired to integrate ethics into their classes and are already able to appreciate the diversity of culture we have today, they will be capable of raising these awareness and understanding to the general public thus, creating future educators and leaders worthy to be followed and admired.


    Josh wrote:[size=18]In what way then can we face this issue? You are correct sir luder and yvette, that as a Christian nation it is sad to see that some of the educators,and worse, prominent religious figures are seemingly disgracing the name of Christianity. How can we address this matter then, as educators and future leaders
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    evancarlo

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    Post  evancarlo on Sun 17 Aug 2008, 12:37 am

    i agree, that time is of utmost important. But who among these days you see in our professors that upholds these ethical values? yes its true that time is only used as alibis. but what i do see in the positive side - time is a vital element. Introducing one element of ethical value would not be accepted by the society. I still remember what sir butcon taught us during my undergrad days that "change is painful", Indeed it is. We will be taking actions now, trying our best to uphold these ethical values, to push through, claim that it is needed, but then again,time will lead the way into such be accepted by the society.

    From the discussion before about dealing with difficult persons, i can relate this topic to that issue, that one element for you to survive is relationship with others. It will all be pointing out on us, on our own self awareness regarding the matter. Its like flapping your wings - expand our horizons to see more clearly and to better understand these issues. In this way, we influence our students and at the same time, honing our leadership skills.

    Josh wrote:The struggke we have is that, we integrate ethical values in our instructional material or course syllabus, but some learners maybe confused because teachers or people they look up to and expected to practice what they preach are the primary violator-no difference with politicians, how can our learners then practice what we preach to them? Another speculation. Very Happy
    Divinia Joy Tuzon wrote:It is true that ethical issues are difficult to address especially if culture is to be considered. It all leads us back to our first discussion forum stressing the importance of self-awareness of the educators. Educators need to recognize and emphasize the essential moral elements already present throughout the curriculum especially through the literature they read, the topics they discuss, the pedagogy they implement, the behaviors they model and reinforce, the relationships they develop, and the virtues they practice everyday. This is why preparing and training students who will be potential educators of the next generation is stressed in the articles we've been reviewing for the past few days. If as early as now students are inspired to integrate ethics into their classes and are already able to appreciate the diversity of culture we have today, they will be capable of raising these awareness and understanding to the general public thus, creating future educators and leaders worthy to be followed and admired.


    Josh wrote:[size=18]In what way then can we face this issue? You are correct sir luder and yvette, that as a Christian nation it is sad to see that some of the educators,and worse, prominent religious figures are seemingly disgracing the name of Christianity. How can we address this matter then, as educators and future leaders
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    patmarban

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    Post  patmarban on Sun 17 Aug 2008, 12:44 am

    Our upbringing gives us the inclination to use "ethics" in our everyday lives (Redner, n.d.). We don't have to be aware of it because it was the way we were brought up.

    REFERENCE:

    Redner, H. (n.d.). Ethical life: the past and present of ethical cultures. Retrieved August 16, 2008 from http://books.google.com/books?id=nAfmuKZz_1kC&pg=PA319&dq=upbringing+and+ethics&lr=&sig=ACfU3U06ebmh_BFKSRz8YvUV9T7B1sAhcA#PPR5,M1

    evancarlo wrote:

    - As we go through the article, It clearly shows the lack of "good" in life. As we define ethics, it is the right conduct and good life. The article, as it may seem, points out only one thing, "ethics". If were going to ask ourselves, do we use "ethics" in our daily life? This is one thing we can realize after reading the article is the importance of using "ethics" not only on a certain situation but is applicable to all.
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    patmarban

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    Post  patmarban on Sun 17 Aug 2008, 12:48 am

    I believe they can be made to feel accountable for their actions by setting good example as a nurse educator. If students have a role model to look up to, then they may turn into responsible future nurse leaders as well.


    luder wrote:
    As a future nurse educator, i would like to incorporate such practices into my would be classes. in my opinion, we are so lacking in ethical principles nowadays because we have lost focus on the direction we want to go. this is true at least for the present generation as i can observe. especially in nursing. we all know at some point that many of our colleagues as well as future colleagues went into nursing not of their own choice. how then can we make them accountable for their actions? i have seen nursing students, some of them i know, who do not take caution in their dealings with patients. and i believe they've already passed the board exam. i can only hope that they have changed their ways and turned for the better, or else...


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    patmarban

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    Post  patmarban on Sun 17 Aug 2008, 12:52 am

    I agree that with the generation of today, some have indifferent attitudes. Students are too glued to the TV or computer games, which is an outlet from reality, to be socially aware of their environment. With this in mind, it is very important to make them interested to learn about ethics.

    Divinia Joy Tuzon wrote:Nowadays, students are not that concerned with environmental and ethical issues anymore. Some possible causes include the students’ lack of knowledge about the issues, their belief that the technology today has the answers to the existing problems we are encountering but the most disturbing among all is that students perceive that these issues have no effect to them causing their disinterest to learn. With this alarming reality, though giving importance to the amount of knowledge and skills students should acquire to master their skills, educators should now devote more time as well to stress the importance of ethics in class. This is what the article teaches us.

    Tier 1 is about introducing the principles of ethics to all students regardless of what their major is (or even their course maybe) as early as possible. The first tier of the study focuses on exposing the students at the earliest time possible to fundamental issues which would prepare them to be better professionals. Tier 2 on the other hand is concerned on integrating ethics into the major courses using various teaching methods used by the educators. I believe that this aspect is significant not only in biology courses but all the available courses out there too. The systematic exposure and teaching of ethics in class would ensure that the framework and necessary background needed by the students are provided. Finally Tier 3 focuses on developing specialized knowledge and its application to ethics. The pedagogy used by the educators will have an immense impact on the students’ learning and appreciation of a certain issue. Let me quote what Garrett (2004) mentioned in the article which I truly believe as well, “Giving one such assignment per semester did not detract from the seminar’s content.” From what I have learned from our Instructional Design class, it is absurd to bombard your students with too many requirements and exams. The quantity and complexity of the requirements given to the students will not determine the quality of their learning.

    Definitely, I believe that the proposed approach can be and should be applied in our setting. The curriculum of every school and university should include ethics as an educational component. Not only college students who are focusing on health-rated courses will benefit from this approach but even young children as well who are in their formative years already. For instance, talking about current issues or topics during breaks (in school) or while eating supper (at homes) will show the students the diversity of opinions their friends and families have. This will motivate them to ponder on the issue and may even lead them to reevaluate their thinking after hearing the opinions of others. In this way, they learn to develop their critical thinking in the long run. Integrating ethics in the education of the students will not only enrich their knowledge and values. It will not only make them better professionals in the future but they will also turn out to become socially and morally aware of the issues bugging our society today as early as now. To conclude my comprehension about the article, I realized once again the critical role of the educators in shaping the values and characters of their students. Part of character education is encouraging the acquisition of these habits by offering students effective role models, both in real life and through stories and heroes (Steve, n.d.). Truly, ethical decision making of students is taught and learned throughout the school, but it is also supplemented and practiced by training in reflection, interaction and cooperation with others.

    Steve, J. (n.d.). “An Education in Ethics”. Article retrieved August 16, 2008 from http://www.scu.edu/ethics/publications/iie/v10n1/education.html
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    evancarlo

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    Post  evancarlo on Sun 17 Aug 2008, 12:52 am

    I agree that its already inclined with us but if im gonna observe myself if i am upholding these ethical values? i may not be aware or unconscious of these actions. As i can observed, people may say that yes, they are upholding ethics in their everyday life, but its very different in their actions. We can see through their actions these kind of behaviors. As what sir josh is saying that how can we influence our students if our leaders are not practicing what they preach? Very confusing.. But i still beleive that theres always room for change. though it may take some time, at least we did try our best.. Very Happy

    patmarban wrote:Our upbringing gives us the inclination to use "ethics" in our everyday lives (Redner, n.d.). We don't have to be aware of it because it was the way we were brought up.

    REFERENCE:

    Redner, H. (n.d.). Ethical life: the past and present of ethical cultures. Retrieved August 16, 2008 from http://books.google.com/books?id=nAfmuKZz_1kC&pg=PA319&dq=upbringing+and+ethics&lr=&sig=ACfU3U06ebmh_BFKSRz8YvUV9T7B1sAhcA#PPR5,M1

    evancarlo wrote:

    - As we go through the article, It clearly shows the lack of "good" in life. As we define ethics, it is the right conduct and good life. The article, as it may seem, points out only one thing, "ethics". If were going to ask ourselves, do we use "ethics" in our daily life? This is one thing we can realize after reading the article is the importance of using "ethics" not only on a certain situation but is applicable to all.
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    Josh

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    Post  Josh on Sun 17 Aug 2008, 12:53 am

    Indeed, mam Lopez, that is a painful reality. This is again another challenge to become ethical even in seemingly wicked environment And no one can ever claim that he/she is 100% upright. What then? are we going to lose faith and give up the desire to uphold ethical values because no can keep up the standard? certainly not, because there is one who showed us the example of being good and obedient just for our righteousness, it is really by God's grace we can be ethical despite all things around us are not.
    sdlopez02 wrote:I agree with you sir josh. It is true that many people have lost their moral ascendancy to teach others as they have tainted themselves with the very "sin" that they are trying to eradicate. the student could say to that person "do not preach what you cannot practice" (as quoted by St. paul himself). Integrity is what we need in a person who would teach us ethics. But it would be difficult to find such a person especially in this fast paced world where almost everyone is clawing themselves to the top in the expense of hurting others in the process.
    Josh wrote:[size=18]The struggke we have is that, we integrate ethical values in our instructional material or course syllabus, but some learners maybe confused because teachers or people they look up to and expected to practice what they preach are the primary violator-no difference with politicians, how can our learners then practice what we preach to them? Another speculation. Very Happy
    Divinia Joy Tuzon wrote:It is true that ethical issues are difficult to address especially if culture is to be considered. It all leads us back to our first discussion forum stressing the importance of self-awareness of the educators. Educators need to recognize and emphasize the essential moral elements already present throughout the curriculum especially through the literature they read, the topics they discuss, the pedagogy they implement, the behaviors they model and reinforce, the relationships they develop, and the virtues they practice everyday. This is why preparing and training students who will be potential educators of the next generation is stressed in the articles we've been reviewing for the past few days. If as early as now students are inspired to integrate ethics into their classes and are already able to appreciate the diversity of culture we have today, they will be capable of raising these awareness and understanding to the general public thus, creating future educators and leaders worthy to be followed and admired.


    Josh wrote:[size=18]In what way then can we face this issue? You are correct sir luder and yvette, that as a Christian nation it is sad to see that some of the educators,and worse, prominent religious figures are seemingly disgracing the name of Christianity. How can we address this matter then, as educators and future leaders
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    patmarban

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    Post  patmarban on Sun 17 Aug 2008, 12:56 am

    Yes, then we should also promote self-awareness through the Johari's window.


    evancarlo wrote:I agree that its already inclined with us but if im gonna observe myself if i am upholding these ethical values? i may not be aware or unconscious of these actions. As i can observed, people may say that yes, they are upholding ethics in their everyday life, but its very different in their actions. We can see through their actions these kind of behaviors. As what sir josh is saying that how can we influence our students if our leaders are not practicing what they preach? Very confusing.. But i still beleive that theres always room for change. though it may take some time, at least we did try our best.. Very Happy

    patmarban wrote:Our upbringing gives us the inclination to use "ethics" in our everyday lives (Redner, n.d.). We don't have to be aware of it because it was the way we were brought up.

    REFERENCE:

    Redner, H. (n.d.). Ethical life: the past and present of ethical cultures. Retrieved August 16, 2008 from http://books.google.com/books?id=nAfmuKZz_1kC&pg=PA319&dq=upbringing+and+ethics&lr=&sig=ACfU3U06ebmh_BFKSRz8YvUV9T7B1sAhcA#PPR5,M1

    evancarlo wrote:

    - As we go through the article, It clearly shows the lack of "good" in life. As we define ethics, it is the right conduct and good life. The article, as it may seem, points out only one thing, "ethics". If were going to ask ourselves, do we use "ethics" in our daily life? This is one thing we can realize after reading the article is the importance of using "ethics" not only on a certain situation but is applicable to all.
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    evancarlo

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    Post  evancarlo on Sun 17 Aug 2008, 12:56 am

    Yes, being accountable and responsible on our actions as educator will trigger the fire in them to further explore ethical values and at the same time influencing and guiding them to become good leaders in the future. Very Happy

    patmarban wrote:I believe they can be made to feel accountable for their actions by setting good example as a nurse educator. If students have a role model to look up to, then they may turn into responsible future nurse leaders as well.


    luder wrote:
    As a future nurse educator, i would like to incorporate such practices into my would be classes. in my opinion, we are so lacking in ethical principles nowadays because we have lost focus on the direction we want to go. this is true at least for the present generation as i can observe. especially in nursing. we all know at some point that many of our colleagues as well as future colleagues went into nursing not of their own choice. how then can we make them accountable for their actions? i have seen nursing students, some of them i know, who do not take caution in their dealings with patients. and i believe they've already passed the board exam. i can only hope that they have changed their ways and turned for the better, or else...


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    Divinia Joy Tuzon

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    Post  Divinia Joy Tuzon on Sun 17 Aug 2008, 1:20 am

    I agree Sir Josh that this really happens. Sad but true.. As a general rule therefore, you should NEVER teach what you don't practice in the first place. Just what I have said earlier and what Sir Patrick mentioned, if students have a role model to look up to, then they may turn into responsible future leaders as well. It now depends on the students to choose who and what kind of role models they will be looking up to. This also points out again to the role the family plays in the students' character development.


    Josh wrote:The struggke we have is that, we integrate ethical values in our instructional material or course syllabus, but some learners maybe confused because teachers or people they look up to and expected to practice what they preach are the primary violator-no difference with politicians, how can our learners then practice what we preach to them? Another speculation. Very Happy

    Divinia Joy Tuzon wrote:It is true that ethical issues are difficult to address especially if culture is to be considered. It all leads us back to our first discussion forum stressing the importance of self-awareness of the educators. Educators need to recognize and emphasize the essential moral elements already present throughout the curriculum especially through the literature they read, the topics they discuss, the pedagogy they implement, the behaviors they model and reinforce, the relationships they develop, and the virtues they practice everyday. This is why preparing and training students who will be potential educators of the next generation is stressed in the articles we've been reviewing for the past few days. If as early as now students are inspired to integrate ethics into their classes and are already able to appreciate the diversity of culture we have today, they will be capable of raising these awareness and understanding to the general public thus, creating future educators and leaders worthy to be followed and admired.


    Josh wrote:[size=18]In what way then can we face this issue? You are correct sir luder and yvette, that as a Christian nation it is sad to see that some of the educators,and worse, prominent religious figures are seemingly disgracing the name of Christianity. How can we address this matter then, as educators and future leaders
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    sdlopez02

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    Post  sdlopez02 on Sun 17 Aug 2008, 1:26 am

    The study targets undergraduate students. What if we assume that "human beings generally know right from wrong, honor from shame, virtue from vice"? That most of these young students, hopefully, have not been tainted with violence and immoral issues as they may have been shielded by their educative years when they were much younger. Then we do not need to reinvent the "ethical wheel".

    Furthermore, "Ethical development is lifelong; it is a process, never a product; it is never “completed.” Then we would serve as the younger generation's guide towards ethical maturity which is until they can go on by themselves and make their own way through an "ethical jungle".

    Reference:
    http://www.airpower.maxwell.af.mil/airchronicles/apj/apj98/sum98/toner.html
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    yvette

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    Post  yvette on Sun 17 Aug 2008, 1:28 am

    Thank you sir patrick for supplementing data (cited model). To remind others: Johari's window is a simple model and useful tool for understanding and training self awareness, personal development, improving communications, interpersonal relationships, group dynamics, team development and intergroup relationships. (Joseph Luft and Harry Ingham, 1950)
    patmarban wrote:Yes, then we should also promote self-awareness through the Johari's window.


    evancarlo wrote:I agree that its already inclined with us but if im gonna observe myself if i am upholding these ethical values? i may not be aware or unconscious of these actions. As i can observed, people may say that yes, they are upholding ethics in their everyday life, but its very different in their actions. We can see through their actions these kind of behaviors. As what sir josh is saying that how can we influence our students if our leaders are not practicing what they preach? Very confusing.. But i still beleive that theres always room for change. though it may take some time, at least we did try our best.. Very Happy

    patmarban wrote:Our upbringing gives us the inclination to use "ethics" in our everyday lives (Redner, n.d.). We don't have to be aware of it because it was the way we were brought up.

    REFERENCE:

    Redner, H. (n.d.). Ethical life: the past and present of ethical cultures. Retrieved August 16, 2008 from http://books.google.com/books?id=nAfmuKZz_1kC&pg=PA319&dq=upbringing+and+ethics&lr=&sig=ACfU3U06ebmh_BFKSRz8YvUV9T7B1sAhcA#PPR5,M1

    evancarlo wrote:

    - As we go through the article, It clearly shows the lack of "good" in life. As we define ethics, it is the right conduct and good life. The article, as it may seem, points out only one thing, "ethics". If were going to ask ourselves, do we use "ethics" in our daily life? This is one thing we can realize after reading the article is the importance of using "ethics" not only on a certain situation but is applicable to all.
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    Divinia Joy Tuzon

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    Post  Divinia Joy Tuzon on Sun 17 Aug 2008, 1:51 am

    That would be really nice then Ma'am Sonia. Let me just share what I have read. Pant (n.d.) found out in her study that studies have attempted to model contextual factors that could possibly affect the individual's ethical decision-making. These include one's personal history and perspective (Reiter and Flynn 1997), the organizational and professional environment (Trevino 1986 and Hunt and Vitell 1986, Victor and Cullen 1988), the larger culture (Hunt and Vitell 1986), and the specific ethical situation (Jones 1991).

    These are the reasons why truly, ethical development never ends and is never completed.

    Pant, L. (n.d.). "What Makes Us Be Good?". Article retrieved August 16, 2008 from http://aux.zicklin.baruch.cuny.edu/critical/html2/8041pant.html


    sdlopez02 wrote:The study targets undergraduate students. What if we assume that "human beings generally know right from wrong, honor from shame, virtue from vice"? That most of these young students, hopefully, have not been tainted with violence and immoral issues as they may have been shielded by their educative years when they were much younger. Then we do not need to reinvent the "ethical wheel".

    Furthermore, "Ethical development is lifelong; it is a process, never a product; it is never “completed.” Then we would serve as the younger generation's guide towards ethical maturity which is until they can go on by themselves and make their own way through an "ethical jungle".

    Reference:
    http://www.airpower.maxwell.af.mil/airchronicles/apj/apj98/sum98/toner.html
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    Cristina Mariano

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    Post  Cristina Mariano on Sun 17 Aug 2008, 1:52 am


    Early Morning Everyone Very Happy ,

    In our instructional design class, we have learned the prerequisites in creating a curriculum design which will include the formulation of goals and objectives and that it is in these goals that we will know what to incorporate in the instructional plan. Ethical components are indeed essential to include because it will set the quality of nurse-professionals students will soon become by the influence of the curriculum where ethical components have been integrated.


    The Inclusion of the Three tiered approach will definitely be very helpful because biology students, in the same manner will be aware of ethical issues and implications and their soon to be commitment to society and the rest of the world when they become scientists. "Many professions enforce a code of ethics to ensure that members of that profession responsibly resolve ethical conflicts. The code may act as a promise to protect and promote the wellbeing of others. Thus, the code may stress a dedication to moral principals and fundamental values. An ideal code of ethics serves as a guide to both help the members of a profession resolve ethical dilemmas and protect the public. Typically, however, a code of ethics reflects and supports the current perspectives of a group of professionals on how to make ethical decisions (Bersoff, 2003).


    I suppose here in the Philippines, many universities have integrated ethics into major courses resembling our experiences, we have a subject that introduces us to laws as well as rules and regulations that emphasize the scope of nursing practice. This is being done in order to prepare us to our future careers so that we will be guided by every ethical implications of nursing practice.


    Yes, I believe that advocating the inclusion of ethical components in our practice will continue to reinforce knowledge to and among our co-professionals, trainees and other personnel’s as well regarding critical issues we encounter everyday. Knowledge on this matter will help us prevent errors, act and move about correctly in accordance to principles that govern nursing practice.



    Reference:

    Isaacs, Mindy (2004). "APA's Ethical Standard # 7: Education & Training:
    An Internet WebQuest on the APA Education & Training Standard " retrieved Aug17, 2008 from http://www.uky.edu/Education/EDP/EthicsQuest/Ethics777.html

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    sdlopez02

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    Post  sdlopez02 on Sun 17 Aug 2008, 2:14 am

    How i understood the article is that the tiered approach of infusing bioethics to the undergraduate education is by designing a curriculum that will compliment bioethics to their courses appropriate to their level in college. To explain further i will use the college of nursing curriculum. when the students are still in their first year, their subjects life-sciences subjects are biology and biochemistry (but not limited to these) which is broad. The first tier involves the introduction of principles of ethics to these students to develop an "awareness". The article suggested visiting the niche of the local fauna/flora and understand the effects of human actions to these species. On their second year, the students attend their major courses in anatomy and physiology and other subjects that becomes more specific to the human biology. The second tier integrates ethics into the major courses. It aims to put into practice the ethical considerations in these subjects and encourages students to debate among themselves several ethical issues. Gradually it instills to the minds of these students the ethical considerations of many human actions and to become more mindful of their actions as well in the future. In their 3rd and 4th year the students are practicing nursing in the hospital/community setting along with their research classes, the third tier steers them to develop a profession specialized in ethics.

    In relation to our course in instructional design, this article reminds us that we need to consider ethics when we teach something our students - that our own actions can affect people and that even if we aspire for the best course of action we can still harm (physically, emotionally, etc) others with or without us knowing.
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    Cristina Mariano

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    Post  Cristina Mariano on Sun 17 Aug 2008, 2:15 am

    Very well said sir josh.. as nurses our noblest committment is by being competently equipped with ethical values since we are dealing with lives. Any error we commit could held us liable since we should not bound to commit any mistakes. Our foundations in our schools molded by the values and scientific knowledge incorporated in our curriculum has really refined the way we carry ourselves and perform as educators and at the bedside..

    Josh wrote:[size=18]The issue of ethics and values against the products of science in relation to sanctity of human life is the core of our discussion. I would like to quote the authors of the article to emphasize assumption above: “Serious consideration of a broad range of ethical issues in science and technology is needed at all levels of education.” However, according to the authors survey conducted to determine the attitudes of genetic professors to the incorporation of ethics into their courses found 93% of instructor devoted less than 5% of class time to ethical issues (less than 7 minutes per week of classes). The reason according to the 95% respondents said that it is because of lack of time.

    The main purpose and emphasis of each tier is to integrate the study of ethics into curriculum without sacrificing the scientific content. To relate it to instructional design, the authors are proposing that as educators we should always consider the ethical value of each instructional materials we produce (Answer to question #1).

    As presented by the outcome of the survey conducted, the lack of time is the greatest challenge for the proposal of the authors. We can also speculate other factors like, the ethical and moral background of the instructors. This simply means that if the teacher has questionable moral background, we can not expect incorporation of ethics on his learning objects or learning contents. There are other factors like, the battle between the scientific relevance vs. ethical relevance. There are great inventions of science that basically abhorred by religion and subject to ethical scrutiny ( e.g. cloning) (answer to question #2).

    For questions numbers 3-5, one advantage if the suggestion will be religiously followed, we can increase morally upright scientists, meaning those scientists that uphold the value of humanity above all else. Disadvantage is the gradual approval of great scientific and high technological breakthroughs since those will be subjected with thorough investigation before it can be allowed for application.

    In Philippine educational system, the suggestion is plausible. I think we are one of those who has great advocacy on integrating ethics as a Christian nation.

    And as nurses, one of our noblest roles is to uphold the sanctity of life, this issue then is a great challenge to us. The rigors of our toxic schedules should not limit us to promote and apply into practice what is morally and highly ethical nursing service. This include us, being students of the MSN executive class, our objective should become better individuals not only focusing on acquiring knowledge and accumulation of credentials, but let us try always to put on wisdom and righteousness, justice and love, that will be highly reflected on the way we think and on how we deal with other people.
    yvette wrote:Good afternoon everyone.
    I apologize for any shortcomings I'll be encountering during the forum later. I'll try my best and hope for your genuine cooperation for a meaningful discussion.
    Thank you po.

    TITLE: A Three-Tiered Approach to Enhance Undergraduate Education in Bioethics

    According to a survey conducted by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), “little attention and only minimal resources have been directed toward professional ethics” which give rise to this article, introducing a new approach to undergraduate education by consolidating the study of ethics in current curriculum.
    Factors: Curricular resources, Instructors' positive attitude and Government's support
    Approach: Tier1: Introducing the principles
    Tier 2: Integrating Ethics into major courses
    Tier 3: Developing specialized knowledge in ethics

    The goal of this forum is to have a deeper understanding of the article, correlating it with our learned knowledge in instructional design class and eventually taking steps to apply it in our profession.

    A set of guide questions are listed to pave way for our discussion.
    1.What is the emphasis of each tier in relation to our instructional design class?
    2.Name advantages and disadvantages of the approach. How must these be dealt?
    3.In your opinion, will the proposed approach be efficient and effective in the Philippine setting? Will you advocate it in your practice?
    4.What are the implications of the approach?

    Again, I apologize and thank you.

    ~ yvette pinzon
    [/size]
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    Kriselda Manzano

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    Post  Kriselda Manzano on Sun 17 Aug 2008, 2:26 am

    The article points out one thing; to give considerable importance on instilling ethics to our learners, to produce better citizens that are “morally responsible”. However this will not materialize overnight, rather as an educator we must shape our students from the beginning that they enter the school.

    I agree with the proposed pedagogy of the authors. For me it is true that our students’ education should not compromise the scientific content of the program rather it should be enriched, by combining the study of ethics into their curriculum.

    The result of this labored work by the educators and schools will be noticeable after several years. I think the world will be a better place if this happens.

    I am aware that science and technology are far ahead, advancement is every where. The question is, does the innovations of science and technology matches the values that we want to achieve?

    Lindell and Milezarek (1997) found that many science faculty lack formal training in ethical theory and do not feel prepared to address ethical issues in their courses. I believe that inclusion of bioethical issues on the course of our incoming educators will provide an opportunity for them to become ethically responsible citizens and later on will mold their students the same way.
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    Post  Kriselda Manzano on Sun 17 Aug 2008, 2:44 am


    Like josh, I think no one cansay that he/ she 100%
    morally upright but one can claim that he is ethically prepared to face issues.
    Realization came to me; one should not engage himself into the academe not
    unless he feels that he is ethically equipped.

    As a future educator I will not engage myself in teaching
    not unless, I feel that I am capable to teach the subject combined with ethics.
    One should not be called a teacher if he is not holistically prepared to shape
    his learners. We must not compromise quality education for the sake of earning
    much.


    Josh wrote:Indeed, mam Lopez, that is a painful reality. This is again another challenge to become ethical even in seemingly wicked environment And no one can ever claim that he/she is 100% upright. What then? are we going to lose faith and give up the desire to uphold ethical values because no can keep up the standard? certainly not, because there is one who showed us the example of being good and obedient just for our righteousness, it is really by God's grace we can be ethical despite all things around us are not.
    sdlopez02 wrote:I agree with you sir josh. It is true that many people have lost their moral ascendancy to teach others as they have tainted themselves with the very "sin" that they are trying to eradicate. the student could say to that person "do not preach what you cannot practice" (as quoted by St. paul himself). Integrity is what we need in a person who would teach us ethics. But it would be difficult to find such a person especially in this fast paced world where almost everyone is clawing themselves to the top in the expense of hurting others in the process.
    Josh wrote:[size=18]The struggke we have is that, we integrate ethical values in our instructional material or course syllabus, but some learners maybe confused because teachers or people they look up to and expected to practice what they preach are the primary violator-no difference with politicians, how can our learners then practice what we preach to them? Another speculation. Very Happy
    Divinia Joy Tuzon wrote:It is true that ethical issues are difficult to address especially if culture is to be considered. It all leads us back to our first discussion forum stressing the importance of self-awareness of the educators. Educators need to recognize and emphasize the essential moral elements already present throughout the curriculum especially through the literature they read, the topics they discuss, the pedagogy they implement, the behaviors they model and reinforce, the relationships they develop, and the virtues they practice everyday. This is why preparing and training students who will be potential educators of the next generation is stressed in the articles we've been reviewing for the past few days. If as early as now students are inspired to integrate ethics into their classes and are already able to appreciate the diversity of culture we have today, they will be capable of raising these awareness and understanding to the general public thus, creating future educators and leaders worthy to be followed and admired.


    Josh wrote:[size=18]In what way then can we face this issue? You are correct sir luder and yvette, that as a Christian nation it is sad to see that some of the educators,and worse, prominent religious figures are seemingly disgracing the name of Christianity. How can we address this matter then, as educators and future leaders
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    gary.orosa

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    Post  gary.orosa on Sun 17 Aug 2008, 3:05 am

    During my nursing studies, when the previous BON members were still in place, it seemed that there was a need to put some sense of priority into our Bioethics subject, knowing that at least one of the Board members was a proponent of Bioethics. After studying the principles and concepts, we practiced answering past board questions on bioethics whose answers I still couldn’t figure out especially its rationale.

    Questions like these were asked of us from the June 2006 NLE:

    Which is the most common problem experienced by a nurse abroad?
    A. Adjustment
    B. Weather
    C. Language
    D. Nutrition
    The question asks for an opinion and does not measure competence.

    The same is true with:
    Many nurses are now leaving the country to work abroad. Aside from money, what would be the other primary reason of nurses leaving for abroad?
    A. Educational opportunity for their children
    B. Immigrant visa
    C. Citizenship
    D. Health care benefits

    A person is peeping over the neighbor's house window of the neighbor. What crime would it constitute?
    A. Harassment
    B. Abuse
    C. Indecency
    D. Assault
    Maybe this question ought to be asked in a criminal law examination not nursing.

    In 2005 Nursing Licensure Exam the following questions were asked:

    An old woman while walking down the street, stepped in a banana peel and fell. What is the best initial response of the nurse who witnessed the incident?

    A. Assess the woman
    B. Pick up the banana peel
    C. Call for help.

    Purportedly the answer is picking up the banana peel. Again, an opinionated question


    A nurse is on a vehicle, sees a mental patient about to jump from a bridge. What would the RN do?

    A. Step down on a vehicle
    B. Call for help
    C. Pray
    The answer accordingly is B Pray but this is not a theology class.

    During and after the exams, no one knew exactly for sure if the answers they chose for these were actually correct unless the examinee can probably perfectly emulate and masterly personify how a nun would think or react, something I never learned to do. So I said to myself maybe choose an answer that would be based on being trustworthy and sincere from the patient’s point of view. I thought the key to answering these was Sincerity. And once you’ve learned to Fake that, there’ll be no stopping you.

    We also had the feeling then that the BON was doing some kind of morality profiling on us.

    But we can only wonder and look at the irony of them doing a morality profiling on us when two of its own members' morality and ethics are in question.

    Imagine every examinee’s disgust and cynicism after knowing that the board did some sort of morality profiling on us when at least 2 of its members:

    -neglect of duty, morality and ethics are now in doubt while we were taught not to be negligent, live out or apply morality, and at the same time absorb all their principles of bioethics;

    -had compromised our exam's credibility and at the same time cast an image of doubt or suspicion on those who made passed;

    -had somehow jeopardized the possibility of the NCLEX coming in here that will translate to additional expenses for everyone;

    -may have divided, brought shame and tarnished the whole Philippine nursing profession both here and overseas;

    and

    -have placed those who passed in a state of ambiguity.

    Admittedly, Bioethics must be enhanced in the nursing curriculum in order to avoid unfortunate incidents such as the canister video incident on you tube by a nursing student. A similar incident such as this also happened in a Stockholm hospital when a nurse posted photos of surgeries on Facebook.

    But will board exams be a tool or will there ever be a tool to determine whether a nurse that learned Bioethics practices it or is ever ethical?

    P.S. While doing some research in the UERM library a month or two ago, i was caught in amazement when I found a book entitled “Nursing Law, Jurisprudence and Ethics”. The authors were Gonzalo Robles and ANESIA B. DIONISIO. Need I say more?


    References:


    Nurse posts surgery photos on Facebook, may lose job. Retrieved August 17, 2008
    http://www.gmanews.tv/story/112993/Nurse-posts-surgery-photos-on-Facebook-may-lose-job

    Privelege Speech Of Congresman Libanan In Response To The 2006 Nursing Licensure Exam Leakage (A Must Read). Retrieved August 17, 2008
    http://pinoybsn.blogspot.com/2006/08/privilege-speech-of-congressman.html



    Josh wrote:The struggke we have is that, we integrate ethical values in our instructional material or course syllabus, but some learners maybe confused because teachers or people they look up to and expected to practice what they preach are the primary violator-no difference with politicians, how can our learners then practice what we preach to them? Another speculation. Very Happy
    Divinia Joy Tuzon wrote:It is true that ethical issues are difficult to address especially if culture is to be considered. It all leads us back to our first discussion forum stressing the importance of self-awareness of the educators. Educators need to recognize and emphasize the essential moral elements already present throughout the curriculum especially through the literature they read, the topics they discuss, the pedagogy they implement, the behaviors they model and reinforce, the relationships they develop, and the virtues they practice everyday. This is why preparing and training students who will be potential educators of the next generation is stressed in the articles we've been reviewing for the past few days. If as early as now students are inspired to integrate ethics into their classes and are already able to appreciate the diversity of culture we have today, they will be capable of raising these awareness and understanding to the general public thus, creating future educators and leaders worthy to be followed and admired.


    Josh wrote:[size=18]In what way then can we face this issue? You are correct sir luder and yvette, that as a Christian nation it is sad to see that some of the educators,and worse, prominent religious figures are seemingly disgracing the name of Christianity. How can we address this matter then, as educators and future leaders
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    Divinia Joy Tuzon

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    Post  Divinia Joy Tuzon on Sun 17 Aug 2008, 3:11 am

    Indeed Kris, we should not just enter into something if we are still unprepared. It's as if we're entering into a war with no weapon or any tactic in mind at all. Most especially if we are dealing with education of our future generation. A noble profession such as being an educator or in our case, nurse-educators, entails great responsibility. What educators teach can make or break their students. This makes educators also accountable in molding the characters and values of their students. It’s great to know that as early as now, as a hopeful educator, you already realized the importance of being skillfully and ethically prepared before engaging into the academe.

    Kriselda Manzano wrote:
    Like josh, I think no one cansay that he/ she 100%
    morally upright but one can claim that he is ethically prepared to face issues.
    Realization came to me; one should not engage himself into the academe not
    unless he feels that he is ethically equipped.

    As a future educator I will not engage myself in teaching
    not unless, I feel that I am capable to teach the subject combined with ethics.
    One should not be called a teacher if he is not holistically prepared to shape
    his learners. We must not compromise quality education for the sake of earning
    much.
    avatar
    Kriselda Manzano

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    Post  Kriselda Manzano on Sun 17 Aug 2008, 4:18 am



    To respond on the guide question #4, I believe that the
    proposed approach is effective in our country since some
    schools started to adapt this pedagogy.

    I’m proud to say that CEU my alma mater still strives to
    produce “morally responsible nurses”. As I recall, Christian values connected
    to nursing practice were included every semester in our loads.
    Young at that time, I can’t understand why our college has to burden us with what I call back then “irrelevant” subjects.


    Moreover, Bioethics was taught to us, ranking like one of
    our major subjects.


    It is only now, that I truly appreciate what my school
    instilled on us. But I have to comment that my former school should have placed Bioethics on our 4th year in nursing, so that the learners are
    matured enough to appreciate it.


    I have posted my college’s Mission for everyone to appreciate.


    MISSION STATEMENT

    Man is a unique Bio-Sociocultural being, always in constant interaction with
    his environment. These interactions affect his state of health.

    The Nurse assumes the role of preventing illness, promoting, maintaining and restoring health.

    Within the context of Philippine society, nursing education subscribes to
    the belief that national identity, cultural consciousness, moral integrity and
    spirituality is a vital component in the development of a Nurse. A broad
    liberal education and a multi-disciplinary approach seek to enhance this
    belief. Nursing education, therefore, aims to prepare a critical thinking
    nurse generalist who, upon completion of the program, demonstrates professional competencies and shall continue to assume responsibility for personal and
    professional development, contributing to the enrichment of Nursing through
    research.


    REFERENCE:

    Centro Escolar University, College of Nursing Mission.
    Retrieved Aug 17, 2008 from http://www.ceu.edu.ph/schools_and_colleges/nursing_welcome.asp
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    ianenguerra

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    Post  ianenguerra on Sun 17 Aug 2008, 6:05 am

    The implications of the approach in the curriculum will may lead to produce more sensitive person to look after his or her action
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    ianenguerra

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    Post  ianenguerra on Sun 17 Aug 2008, 6:20 am

    i agree with the study that personal perspective of a person even his or her culture greatly affect the individual ethical decision making. like culture, values also has a big impact in decision making as values influence choices and provide framework for life goals.


    Divinia Joy Tuzon wrote:That would be really nice then Ma'am Sonia. Let me just share what I have read. Pant (n.d.) found out in her study that studies have attempted to model contextual factors that could possibly affect the individual's ethical decision-making. These include one's personal history and perspective (Reiter and Flynn 1997), the organizational and professional environment (Trevino 1986 and Hunt and Vitell 1986, Victor and Cullen 1988), the larger culture (Hunt and Vitell 1986), and the specific ethical situation (Jones 1991).

    These are the reasons why truly, ethical development never ends and is never completed.

    Pant, L. (n.d.). "What Makes Us Be Good?". Article retrieved August 16, 2008 from http://aux.zicklin.baruch.cuny.edu/critical/html2/8041pant.html


    sdlopez02 wrote:The study targets undergraduate students. What if we assume that "human beings generally know right from wrong, honor from shame, virtue from vice"? That most of these young students, hopefully, have not been tainted with violence and immoral issues as they may have been shielded by their educative years when they were much younger. Then we do not need to reinvent the "ethical wheel".

    Furthermore, "Ethical development is lifelong; it is a process, never a product; it is never “completed.” Then we would serve as the younger generation's guide towards ethical maturity which is until they can go on by themselves and make their own way through an "ethical jungle".

    Reference:
    http://www.airpower.maxwell.af.mil/airchronicles/apj/apj98/sum98/toner.html

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