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    Discussion Forum 4

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    luder

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    Re: Discussion Forum 4

    Post  luder on Mon 18 Aug 2008, 11:55 pm

    In your opinion, is it ethical (from our previous article) to you use cases regarding doctor's indifference with patients as a point of discussion of non-caring behavior in class?

    patmarban wrote:Yes. Also in relation to the previous article we discussed, because of the tremendous amount of theories and facts that had to be studied by med students, the caring aspect in healthcare is sometimes not given focus anymore. I share the same sentiments with you when I go to doctors' clinics. I am not generalizing, but I sometimes come out ranting about how insolent and fretful some doctors could be, especially those with fellow certifications! I believe that not only the nursing profession in the Philippines should have developments in pedagogy but also the other professions. I am also glad to be in the nursing profession as I feel this profession is more well-rounded in terms of knowledge and attitude.


    Divinia Joy Tuzon wrote:Being in a university where students are basically involved in a health-related course, I've noticed that med students are taught differently compared to the other students, specifically nursing students. This made me realize that maybe physicians truly have this “we’re the captain of the ship” mentality. I cannot comment and dwell that much regarding the manner on how med students are supposed to be taught as well as how they learn from such approach. Though they should teach and consider showing more caring behaviors to their patients, if I may say so. It just makes me really proud and happy being involved in this caring profession.


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    sdlopez02

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    Re: Discussion Forum 4

    Post  sdlopez02 on Tue 19 Aug 2008, 12:49 am

    [scroll]Good evening everyone,

    Today's topic is a very interesting one. I for one support the cause of using case studies in teaching students because of its benefits for both the teacher and students. Using case studies will guide students in “putting the theory into practice”. Case studies are based on the real world context which will entail the processing of a learned topic and the experience of the students to analyze the events situated in a sample case study. Moreover, with the analysis of the events pertaining to the sample case study comes the exploration of multiple perspectives (based on the past experiences and lessons of the students) to identify an outcome. Furthermore, it requires critical thinking (analytical thinking) to reflect upon the case study by using scientific evidences with common sense to reach a conclusion.

    For me, all of these benefits contribute in nurturing the experience of a student to identify “similar” problems encountered in the future. It promotes self-exploration of resources by the student in coming out with a conclusion for the case study.

    References:
    Pyatt, E. (2006), “Using cases in teaching”. Article retrieved August 18, 2008 from http://tlt.psu.edu/suggestions/cases/

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    patmarban

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    Re: Discussion Forum 4

    Post  patmarban on Tue 19 Aug 2008, 12:53 am

    That is a good question! In bioethics, we have a common understanding of courtesy towards our collegues. This applies to the academe and to the clinics as well. This means if one finds oneself to be in an incongruous situation with a collegue, be it giving a wrong teaching to a patient or student, this must be discussed internally and personally by the two parties, and not "bad mouth" the other party in front of the learners, so to speak. In turn, it is the responsibility of the collegue who gave the wrong information to correct himself to the learners.

    With regard to using doctors' indifference as cases as point of discussion of non-caring behavior, I believe that by emphasizing this idea anonymously and in a general sense, the learners may get the whole picture. Anonymously in a way that one does not reveal the identities of doctors being discussed. Also, one must emphasize that there are also many caring doctors. Although I am not aware of any study regarding doctors' indifference in the Philippines, I can tell by experience that encountering indifferent doctors is not uncommon in the Philippines. It is also important to note that a study by Bankauskaite and Saarelma in 2003 indicated that doctors' defeciency in attitude is a cause of dissatisfaction among people in Lithuania.

    In bringing out this kind of concept, the instructor may assess if the learners can relate by asking, "Have you encountered an indifferent, impatient, or fretful doctor?" Ofcourse, if the learners cannot relate, then the instructor must look for other ways to introduce the concept of non-caring behaviour like using the Good Samaritan parable in the Bible.


    REFERENCE:


    Bankauskaite, V. & Saarelma, O. (2003). Why are people dissatisfied with medical care services in Lithuania? A qualitative study using responses to open-ended questions. International Journal for Quality in Health Care, 15(1):23-29. Retrieved August 18, 2008 from http://pt.wkhealth.com/pt/re/ijqh/abstract.00042154-200302000-00006.htm;jsessionid=LpXGnp20MP81DTcGgbdQhpvsjMNLGdrFvLGwvL3yp1bQJ3DFNJhq!63116428!181195628!8091!-1

    luder wrote:In your opinion, is it ethical (from our previous article) to you use cases regarding doctor's indifference with patients as a point of discussion of non-caring behavior in class?

    patmarban wrote:Yes. Also in relation to the previous article we discussed, because of the tremendous amount of theories and facts that had to be studied by med students, the caring aspect in healthcare is sometimes not given focus anymore. I share the same sentiments with you when I go to doctors' clinics. I am not generalizing, but I sometimes come out ranting about how insolent and fretful some doctors could be, especially those with fellow certifications! I believe that not only the nursing profession in the Philippines should have developments in pedagogy but also the other professions. I am also glad to be in the nursing profession as I feel this profession is more well-rounded in terms of knowledge and attitude.


    Divinia Joy Tuzon wrote:Being in a university where students are basically involved in a health-related course, I've noticed that med students are taught differently compared to the other students, specifically nursing students. This made me realize that maybe physicians truly have this “we’re the captain of the ship” mentality. I cannot comment and dwell that much regarding the manner on how med students are supposed to be taught as well as how they learn from such approach. Though they should teach and consider showing more caring behaviors to their patients, if I may say so. It just makes me really proud and happy being involved in this caring profession.


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    luder

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    Re: Discussion Forum 4

    Post  luder on Tue 19 Aug 2008, 12:59 am

    we all agree on the benefits case study method can give the learner. but are there any drawbacks in using the case study method?

    sdlopez02 wrote:[scroll]

    Good evening everyone,

    Today's topic is a very interesting one. I for one support the cause of using case studies in teaching students because of its benefits for both the teacher and students. Using case studies will guide students in “putting the theory into practice”. Case studies are based on the real world context which will entail the processing of a learned topic and the experience of the students to analyze the events situated in a sample case study. Moreover, with the analysis of the events pertaining to the sample case study comes the exploration of multiple perspectives (based on the past experiences and lessons of the students) to identify an outcome. Furthermore, it requires critical thinking (analytical thinking) to reflect upon the case study by using scientific evidences with common sense to reach a conclusion.

    For me, all of these benefits contribute in nurturing the experience of a student to identify “similar” problems encountered in the future. It promotes self-exploration of resources by the student in coming out with a conclusion for the case study.

    References:
    Pyatt, E. (2006), “Using cases in teaching”. Article retrieved August 18, 2008 from http://tlt.psu.edu/suggestions/cases/

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    Josh

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    Re: Discussion Forum 4

    Post  Josh on Tue 19 Aug 2008, 1:04 am

    If there are cases like that, it is an opportunity for us, nurses-educator, to grab the opportunity to teach caring and utmost reverence to life of our patient. Doctors are not basis for genuine care but nurses are. do you agree?
    luder wrote:In your opinion, is it ethical (from our previous article) to you use cases regarding doctor's indifference with patients as a point of discussion of non-caring behavior in class?
    patmarban wrote:Yes. Also in relation to the previous article we discussed, because of the tremendous amount of theories and facts that had to be studied by med students, the caring aspect in healthcare is sometimes not given focus anymore. I share the same sentiments with you when I go to doctors' clinics. I am not generalizing, but I sometimes come out ranting about how insolent and fretful some doctors could be, especially those with fellow certifications! I believe that not only the nursing profession in the Philippines should have developments in pedagogy but also the other professions. I am also glad to be in the nursing profession as I feel this profession is more well-rounded in terms of knowledge and attitude.


    Divinia Joy Tuzon wrote:Being in a university where students are basically involved in a health-related course, I've noticed that med students are taught differently compared to the other students, specifically nursing students. This made me realize that maybe physicians truly have this “we’re the captain of the ship” mentality. I cannot comment and dwell that much regarding the manner on how med students are supposed to be taught as well as how they learn from such approach. Though they should teach and consider showing more caring behaviors to their patients, if I may say so. It just makes me really proud and happy being involved in this caring profession.


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    luder

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    Re: Discussion Forum 4

    Post  luder on Tue 19 Aug 2008, 1:04 am

    very well said! thank you for the substantial answer!


    patmarban wrote:That is a good question! In bioethics, we have a common understanding of courtesy towards our collegues. This applies to the academe and to the clinics as well. This means if one finds oneself to be in an incongruous situation with a collegue, be it giving a wrong teaching to a patient or student, this must be discussed internally and personally by the two parties, and not "bad mouth" the other party in front of the learners, so to speak. In turn, it is the responsibility of the collegue who gave the wrong information to correct himself to the learners.

    With regard to using doctors' indifference as cases as point of discussion of non-caring behavior, I believe that by emphasizing this idea anonymously and in a general sense, the learners may get the whole picture. Anonymously in a way that one does not reveal the identities of doctors being discussed. Also, one must emphasize that there are also many caring doctors. Although I am not aware of any study regarding doctors' indifference in the Philippines, I can tell by experience that encountering indifferent doctors is not uncommon in the Philippines. It is also important to note that a study by Bankauskaite and Saarelma in 2003 indicated that doctors' defeciency in attitude is a cause of dissatisfaction among people in Lithuania.

    In bringing out this kind of concept, the instructor may assess if the learners can relate by asking, "Have you encountered an indifferent, impatient, or fretful doctor?" Ofcourse, if the learners cannot relate, then the instructor must look for other ways to introduce the concept of non-caring behaviour like using the Good Samaritan parable in the Bible.


    REFERENCE:


    Bankauskaite, V. & Saarelma, O. (2003). Why are people dissatisfied with medical care services in Lithuania? A qualitative study using responses to open-ended questions. International Journal for Quality in Health Care, 15(1):23-29. Retrieved August 18, 2008 from http://pt.wkhealth.com/pt/re/ijqh/abstract.00042154-200302000-00006.htm;jsessionid=LpXGnp20MP81DTcGgbdQhpvsjMNLGdrFvLGwvL3yp1bQJ3DFNJhq!63116428!181195628!8091!-1

    luder wrote:In your opinion, is it ethical (from our previous article) to you use cases regarding doctor's indifference with patients as a point of discussion of non-caring behavior in class?


    Last edited by luder on Tue 19 Aug 2008, 1:04 am; edited 1 time in total
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    sdlopez02

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    Re: Discussion Forum 4

    Post  sdlopez02 on Tue 19 Aug 2008, 1:04 am

    In my opinion, yes, it can be used as case study. The mere fact that the experience has happened can automatically present it as a case as it is based in a “real-world scenario”. Ethics come into play when presenting that case study by “changing or simplifying the scenario to ‘protect the innocent’”. Actions such changing the name of the “actual” people in the event ensure privacy and confidentiality and preserve the honor (or dignity) of that person.
    luder wrote:In your opinion, is it ethical (from our previous article) to you use cases regarding doctor's indifference with patients as a point of discussion of non-caring behavior in class?

    patmarban wrote:Yes. Also in relation to the previous article we discussed, because of the tremendous amount of theories and facts that had to be studied by med students, the caring aspect in healthcare is sometimes not given focus anymore. I share the same sentiments with you when I go to doctors' clinics. I am not generalizing, but I sometimes come out ranting about how insolent and fretful some doctors could be, especially those with fellow certifications! I believe that not only the nursing profession in the Philippines should have developments in pedagogy but also the other professions. I am also glad to be in the nursing profession as I feel this profession is more well-rounded in terms of knowledge and attitude.


    Divinia Joy Tuzon wrote:Being in a university where students are basically involved in a health-related course, I've noticed that med students are taught differently compared to the other students, specifically nursing students. This made me realize that maybe physicians truly have this “we’re the captain of the ship” mentality. I cannot comment and dwell that much regarding the manner on how med students are supposed to be taught as well as how they learn from such approach. Though they should teach and consider showing more caring behaviors to their patients, if I may say so. It just makes me really proud and happy being involved in this caring profession.


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    ianenguerra

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    Re: Discussion Forum 4

    Post  ianenguerra on Tue 19 Aug 2008, 1:04 am

    Case study is an ideal methodology when a holistic, in-depth investigation is needed (Feagin, Orum, & Sjoberg, 1991). Case studies have been used in varied investigations, particularly in sociological studies, but increasingly, in instruction. Yin in 1993 has identified some specific types of case studies: Exploratory, Explanatory, and Descriptive. Exploratory cases are sometimes considered as a prelude to social research. Explanatory case studies may be used for doing causal investigations. Descriptive cases require a descriptive theory to be developed before starting the project.


    The case method encourages students to grapple with exactly the kinds of decisions and dilemmas confront every day. In doing so, it redefines the traditional educational dynamic in which the professor dispenses knowledge and students passively receive it. The case method creates a classroom in which students succeed not by simply absorbing facts and theories, but also by exercising the skills of leadership and teamwork in the face of real problems. Under the skillful guidance of a faculty member, they work together to analyze and synthesize conflicting data and points of view, to define and prioritize goals, to persuade and inspire others who think differently, to make tough decisions with uncertain information, and to seize opportunity in the face of doubt.

    In nursing school case study method is very appropriate now a day. As a medical course the student must the real picture of the study. In this kind of method the student will learn a lot.


    Ref.

    Winston Tellis, Application of a Case Study Methodology. The Qualitative Report, Volume 3, Number 3, September, 1997 (http://www.nova.edu/ssss/QR/QR3-3/tellis2.html)
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    luder

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    Re: Discussion Forum 4

    Post  luder on Tue 19 Aug 2008, 1:08 am

    This is good! we can agree that using the case study method is one way we can incorporate ethics in nursing education.

    sdlopez02 wrote:In my opinion, yes, it can be used as case study. The mere fact that the experience has happened can automatically present it as a case as it is based in a “real-world scenario”. Ethics come into play when presenting that case study by “changing or simplifying the scenario to ‘protect the innocent’”. Actions such changing the name of the “actual” people in the event ensure privacy and confidentiality and preserve the honor (or dignity) of that person.
    luder wrote:In your opinion, is it ethical (from our previous article) to you use cases regarding doctor's indifference with patients as a point of discussion of non-caring behavior in class?

    ]
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    Divinia Joy Tuzon

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    Re: Discussion Forum 4

    Post  Divinia Joy Tuzon on Tue 19 Aug 2008, 1:10 am

    That’s a very good question Sir Luther! I really believe that as early as first year, med students should learn the value of caring and showing empathy to their patients and I think even the doctors who have been practicing for years already should be reminded of this as well from time to time. I have nothing against them and just like what Sir Patrick said, I am not generalizing all the doctors. I know that there are still good doctors out there. However, though it may be true that doctors show less care to the patients compared to what nurses exhibit, I don’t think it is proper and right to use them as examples of non-caring behaviors. Just like us nurses, doctors are also using their own standards and Code of Ethics which we can't question anyway. Though the controversial issue of doctor-nurse relationship may still exist, I sincerely believe that we should set aside these differences and focus instead on working as partners for our patients’ sake. Hence, it would be unethical to do such thing. If we use that as a point of discussion (or even consider doing it), what makes us different from “those” doctors then? It all leads us back to the importance of why students (such as med and nursing students) should have strong foundations as early as possible not only in terms of the knowledge they need to master their profession but the values as well since both are involved in a profession serving our people.


    luder wrote:In your opinion, is it ethical (from our previous article) to you use cases regarding doctor's indifference with patients as a point of discussion of non-caring behavior in class?

    patmarban wrote:Yes. Also in relation to the previous article we discussed, because of the tremendous amount of theories and facts that had to be studied by med students, the caring aspect in healthcare is sometimes not given focus anymore. I share the same sentiments with you when I go to doctors' clinics. I am not generalizing, but I sometimes come out ranting about how insolent and fretful some doctors could be, especially those with fellow certifications! I believe that not only the nursing profession in the Philippines should have developments in pedagogy but also the other professions. I am also glad to be in the nursing profession as I feel this profession is more well-rounded in terms of knowledge and attitude.


    Divinia Joy Tuzon wrote:Being in a university where students are basically involved in a health-related course, I've noticed that med students are taught differently compared to the other students, specifically nursing students. This made me realize that maybe physicians truly have this “we’re the captain of the ship” mentality. I cannot comment and dwell that much regarding the manner on how med students are supposed to be taught as well as how they learn from such approach. Though they should teach and consider showing more caring behaviors to their patients, if I may say so. It just makes me really proud and happy being involved in this caring profession.


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    luder

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    Re: Discussion Forum 4

    Post  luder on Tue 19 Aug 2008, 1:13 am

    where would nursing case presentations fall under?

    ianenguerra wrote:

    Yin in 1993 has identified some specific types of case studies: Exploratory, Explanatory, and Descriptive. Exploratory cases are sometimes considered as a prelude to social research. Explanatory case studies may be used for doing causal investigations. Descriptive cases require a descriptive theory to be developed before starting the project.


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    yvette

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    Re: Discussion Forum 4

    Post  yvette on Tue 19 Aug 2008, 1:15 am

    The article speaks of a learning strategy, a case study method. Similar with other instructional techniques in teaching, it has enveloped negative and positive points. Expectedly, this type of method ought to develop the students’ interest and concentrate on the significance of concepts. In the process, however, it may not define the objectives.

    The National Research Council's (2005) meta-analysis of current research on how students learn science concluded that there are three established principles about learning that can be used to drive educational reform. First, students come to the classroom with alternative conceptions based on their prior knowledge that are highly resistant to change. Second, development of competency in a discipline requires a deep foundation of factual knowledge that is organized in a "conceptual framework". Third, students can learn to take control of their own learning through "metacognitive approaches" that define their learning goals and help them assess their progress.

    At present, I think the case study method is beneficial and an effective way of learning. When I was in the undergraduate school, I enjoy exposures to real life situation. I learned a lot of my so-called ‘first time’ learning experiences. They made an impact on me, as compared to merely reading books on my own. Similar with the previous articles we’ve read it serves like a compass, guiding and leading learners to more knowledge. Our role as students in the graduate school and current instructors is to equip ourselves with different learning techniques, so as to supplement it with the traditional way that we have grown with.

    National Science Teachers Association. 1840 Wilson Boulevard, Arlington, VA 22201-3000. Tel: 800-722-6782; Fax: 703-243-3924; e-mail: membership@nsta.org; Web site: http://www.nsta.org
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    sdlopez02

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    Re: Discussion Forum 4

    Post  sdlopez02 on Tue 19 Aug 2008, 1:17 am

    Drawbacks that result from the case study method are mainly due to errors in the selection and presentation of the case study. Sometimes the relevance of a case may not be well understood by the students and they particularly "miss the point". Another is that case studies, as said earlier, are effective for learners with an appropriate level of cognitive function for abstract reasoning and critical thinking. So to before considering to use case studies, the instructor should find out "who are her students?"

    luder wrote:we all agree on the benefits case study method can give the learner. but are there any drawbacks in using the case study method?
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    luder

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    Re: Discussion Forum 4

    Post  luder on Tue 19 Aug 2008, 1:21 am

    i don't know about you guys, but isn't this the alternative conceptions principle in the works already? with patrick, ava and mam sonia sharing their own ideas and experiences. the goal from start i think (i failed to specify in my introduction) was to appreciate the effectivity of the case study method in teaching. later lets see if we were able to accomplish this...

    Divinia Joy Tuzon wrote:That’s a very good question Sir Luther! I really believe that as early as first year, med students should learn the value of caring and showing empathy to their patients and I think even the doctors who have been practicing for years already should be reminded of this as well from time to time. I have nothing against them and just like what Sir Patrick said, I am not generalizing all the doctors. I know that there are still good doctors out there. However, though it may be true that doctors show less care to the patients compared to what nurses exhibit, I don’t think it is proper and right to use them as examples of non-caring behaviors. Just like us nurses, doctors are also using their own standards and Code of Ethics which we can't question anyway. Though the controversial issue of doctor-nurse relationship may still exist, I sincerely believe that we should set aside these differences and focus instead on working as partners for our patients’ sake. Hence, it would be unethical to do such thing. If we use that as a point of discussion (or even consider doing it), what makes us different from “those” doctors then? It all leads us back to the importance of why students (such as med and nursing students) should have strong foundations as early as possible not only in terms of the knowledge they need to master their profession but the values as well since both are involved in a profession serving our people.


    luder wrote:In your opinion, is it ethical (from our previous article) to you use cases regarding doctor's indifference with patients as a point of discussion of non-caring behavior in class?

    patmarban wrote:Yes. Also in relation to the previous article we discussed, because of the tremendous amount of theories and facts that had to be studied by med students, the caring aspect in healthcare is sometimes not given focus anymore. I share the same sentiments with you when I go to doctors' clinics. I am not generalizing, but I sometimes come out ranting about how insolent and fretful some doctors could be, especially those with fellow certifications! I believe that not only the nursing profession in the Philippines should have developments in pedagogy but also the other professions. I am also glad to be in the nursing profession as I feel this profession is more well-rounded in terms of knowledge and attitude.


    Divinia Joy Tuzon wrote:Being in a university where students are basically involved in a health-related course, I've noticed that med students are taught differently compared to the other students, specifically nursing students. This made me realize that maybe physicians truly have this “we’re the captain of the ship” mentality. I cannot comment and dwell that much regarding the manner on how med students are supposed to be taught as well as how they learn from such approach. Though they should teach and consider showing more caring behaviors to their patients, if I may say so. It just makes me really proud and happy being involved in this caring profession.


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    sdlopez02

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    Re: Discussion Forum 4

    Post  sdlopez02 on Tue 19 Aug 2008, 1:29 am

    I found an article that tackles on some of the difficulties students face when dealing with case studies:

    Why is it hard for students to learn with cases?

    1. Students may be uncomfortable with open-ended assignments. Many students view education as a collection of well-defined facts that reach a common understanding and assignments as always having a single solution.
    2. Students often lack experience with an open-ended problem-solving format in the classroom.
    3. If the case assignment is too complex, the material may frustrate students and shut down the very critical thinking skills the assignment may be trying to foster.
    4. If the case assignment is a team assignment, students may need to understand team dynamics in order successfully complete the tasks.
    5. A very controversial case could lead to extreme emotional reactions.

    References:
    Pyatt, E. (2006), “Using cases in teaching”, Article retrieved August 18, 2008 from http://tlt.psu.edu/suggestions/cases/
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    luder

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    Re: Discussion Forum 4

    Post  luder on Tue 19 Aug 2008, 1:31 am

    what kind of exposures are you talking about? interactions with patients? case analysis and then presentation? pls explain further. thanks!

    yvette wrote:

    When I was in the undergraduate school, I enjoy exposures to real life situation. I learned a lot of my so-called ‘first time’ learning experiences. They made an impact on me, as compared to merely reading books on my own.

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    Divinia Joy Tuzon

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    Re: Discussion Forum 4

    Post  Divinia Joy Tuzon on Tue 19 Aug 2008, 1:31 am

    That’s quite difficult to answer Sir Josh. Not that I’m belittling the medical profession or anything (because truly, being a doctor is such a noble profession) but I have to say yes on that one. Yes, I agree that nurses are basis for genuine care not doctors. I believe that what defines nursing and sets it apart from other health care professions, particularly medicine is our caring role. The American Nurses Association (2007) claims that nurses are educated to be attuned to the whole person, not just the unique presenting health problem. ANA also adds that while a medical diagnosis of an illness may be fairly circumscribed, the human response to a health problem may be much more fluid and variable and may have a great effect on the individual’s ability to overcome the initial medical problem. I hope it would not be offending if I say that "Physicians cure. Nurses care."


    Reference:

    American Nurses Association. (2007). “Registered Nurses: A Distinctive Health Care Profession”. Article retrieved August 18, 2008 from http://www.georgianurses.org/NursingFactsBrochure1.pdf



    Josh wrote:If there are cases like that, it is an opportunity for us, nurses-educator, to grab the opportunity to teach caring and utmost reverence to life of our patient. Doctors are not basis for genuine care but nurses are. do you agree?
    luder wrote:In your opinion, is it ethical (from our previous article) to you use cases regarding doctor's indifference with patients as a point of discussion of non-caring behavior in class?
    patmarban wrote:Yes. Also in relation to the previous article we discussed, because of the tremendous amount of theories and facts that had to be studied by med students, the caring aspect in healthcare is sometimes not given focus anymore. I share the same sentiments with you when I go to doctors' clinics. I am not generalizing, but I sometimes come out ranting about how insolent and fretful some doctors could be, especially those with fellow certifications! I believe that not only the nursing profession in the Philippines should have developments in pedagogy but also the other professions. I am also glad to be in the nursing profession as I feel this profession is more well-rounded in terms of knowledge and attitude.


    Divinia Joy Tuzon wrote:Being in a university where students are basically involved in a health-related course, I've noticed that med students are taught differently compared to the other students, specifically nursing students. This made me realize that maybe physicians truly have this “we’re the captain of the ship” mentality. I cannot comment and dwell that much regarding the manner on how med students are supposed to be taught as well as how they learn from such approach. Though they should teach and consider showing more caring behaviors to their patients, if I may say so. It just makes me really proud and happy being involved in this caring profession.


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    luder

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    Re: Discussion Forum 4

    Post  luder on Tue 19 Aug 2008, 1:34 am

    thank you for this contribution. It seems that the student's readiness to higher level thinking is also a big influence in the success of the case study method. probably, this method is more ideal for junior and senior students? what do you guys think? or maybe what we only need to do is taper the complexity of the topic to be discussed?

    sdlopez02 wrote:I found an article that tackles on some of the difficulties students face when dealing with case studies:

    Why is it hard for students to learn with cases?

    1. Students may be uncomfortable with open-ended assignments. Many students view education as a collection of well-defined facts that reach a common understanding and assignments as always having a single solution.
    2. Students often lack experience with an open-ended problem-solving format in the classroom.
    3. If the case assignment is too complex, the material may frustrate students and shut down the very critical thinking skills the assignment may be trying to foster.
    4. If the case assignment is a team assignment, students may need to understand team dynamics in order successfully complete the tasks.
    5. A very controversial case could lead to extreme emotional reactions.

    References:
    Pyatt, E. (2006), “Using cases in teaching”, Article retrieved August 18, 2008 from http://tlt.psu.edu/suggestions/cases/
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    Kriselda Anne Moreno

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    Re: Discussion Forum 4

    Post  Kriselda Anne Moreno on Tue 19 Aug 2008, 1:38 am

    The article shows another pedagogical approach that will aid us in learning. Introducing case method to teaching science holds a promise because it often enhances student’s interest and focuses on the relevance of the subject matter, improving the student’s learning. (Gallucci, 2006) It also develops student’s critical thinking since many of the best cases are based on contemporary science problems that students encounter on the news, like cloning. Students’ reasoning skills are also developed because case method allows them to view things in a different perspective. For the down side of this case method is that this may focus only on one case that may not be generalized to others. One’s experience may not be the same with another. With this, we may learn to apply this to one population, but may have a hard time applying it to other larger population.

    Its applicability in the Philippines may be difficult. Here, we still rely in the traditional way of learning, like going to school everyday, and make teacher-student conversation. Applying this method immediately may require a lot of adjustment in the part of the teachers and the learners. But at this time, I believe that this method is slowly introduced in our education system. By allowing us to do case presentations alone, present it to the class, and make modifications in it for polishing.


    Gallucci, K. (2006). “Learning Concepts with Cases”. Journal of College Science Teaching, 36, 16.
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    Kriselda Anne Moreno

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    Re: Discussion Forum 4

    Post  Kriselda Anne Moreno on Tue 19 Aug 2008, 1:42 am

    I agree.The case study method, in my opinion, chooses its students. It is somehow appropriate for those who are fast-learners, requiring a certain level of critical thinking and reasoning for the process.

    sdlopez02 wrote:Drawbacks that result from the case study method are mainly due to errors in the selection and presentation of the case study. Sometimes the relevance of a case may not be well understood by the students and they particularly "miss the point". Another is that case studies, as said earlier, are effective for learners with an appropriate level of cognitive function for abstract reasoning and critical thinking. So to before considering to use case studies, the instructor should find out "who are her students?"

    luder wrote:we all agree on the benefits case study method can give the learner. but are there any drawbacks in using the case study method?
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    luder

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    Re: Discussion Forum 4

    Post  luder on Tue 19 Aug 2008, 1:43 am

    this takes the cake! kinurot ang puso ko with this one.

    Divinia Joy Tuzon wrote:

    "Physicians cure. Nurses care."


    Josh wrote:If there are cases like that, it is an opportunity for us, nurses-educator, to grab the opportunity to teach caring and utmost reverence to life of our patient. Doctors are not basis for genuine care but nurses are. do you agree?
    luder wrote:In your opinion, is it ethical (from our previous article) to you use cases regarding doctor's indifference with patients as a point of discussion of non-caring behavior in class?



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    yvette

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    Re: Discussion Forum 4

    Post  yvette on Tue 19 Aug 2008, 1:48 am

    in my opinion, nursing case presentations would fall to neither the three mentioned specific types of case studies depending on the topic or case. For example, community case presentations are oftentimes an exploratory type. cases in the ccu unit are most often an explanatory one.
    luder wrote:where would nursing case presentations fall under?

    ianenguerra wrote:

    Yin in 1993 has identified some specific types of case studies: Exploratory, Explanatory, and Descriptive. Exploratory cases are sometimes considered as a prelude to social research. Explanatory case studies may be used for doing causal investigations. Descriptive cases require a descriptive theory to be developed before starting the project.


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    luder

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    Re: Discussion Forum 4

    Post  luder on Tue 19 Aug 2008, 1:52 am

    is it your opinion then that the application of the case study method, as presented in the article, to the nursing curriculum would not be that effective?

    Kriselda Anne Moreno wrote:

    Its applicability in the Philippines may be difficult. Here, we still rely in the traditional way of learning, like going to school everyday, and make teacher-student conversation. Applying this method immediately may require a lot of adjustment in the part of the teachers and the learners. But at this time, I believe that this method is slowly introduced in our education system. By allowing us to do case presentations alone, present it to the class, and make modifications in it for polishing.

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    luder

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    Re: Discussion Forum 4

    Post  luder on Tue 19 Aug 2008, 1:53 am

    i see your point it would really depend on the topic. thank you for clarifying this.

    yvette wrote:in my opinion, nursing case presentations would fall to neither the three mentioned specific types of case studies depending on the topic or case. For example, community case presentations are oftentimes an exploratory type. cases in the ccu unit are most often an explanatory one.
    luder wrote:where would nursing case presentations fall under?

    ianenguerra wrote:

    Yin in 1993 has identified some specific types of case studies: Exploratory, Explanatory, and Descriptive. Exploratory cases are sometimes considered as a prelude to social research. Explanatory case studies may be used for doing causal investigations. Descriptive cases require a descriptive theory to be developed before starting the project.


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    yvette

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    Re: Discussion Forum 4

    Post  yvette on Tue 19 Aug 2008, 1:56 am

    ouch! my apologies, but i got hurt with the generalization. I think there are physicians who handle their patients with care. Let us not label people. I think there are nurses by profession who do not even care!
    I think both doctors and nurses provides care in their little and different ways.

    luder wrote:this takes the cake! kinurot ang puso ko with this one.

    Divinia Joy Tuzon wrote:

    "Physicians cure. Nurses care."


    Josh wrote:If there are cases like that, it is an opportunity for us, nurses-educator, to grab the opportunity to teach caring and utmost reverence to life of our patient. Doctors are not basis for genuine care but nurses are. do you agree?
    luder wrote:In your opinion, is it ethical (from our previous article) to you use cases regarding doctor's indifference with patients as a point of discussion of non-caring behavior in class?




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