E-learning modules for Integrated Virtual Learning


    Discussion Forum 7

    Share
    avatar
    evancarlo

    Posts : 53
    Join date : 2008-08-12

    Re: Discussion Forum 7

    Post  evancarlo on Fri 22 Aug 2008, 1:15 am

    When individual children do not make expected learning progress, neither grade retention nor social promotion are used; instead, initiatives such as more focused time, individualized instruction, tutoring, or other individual strategies are used to accelerate children's learning (Shepard & Smith 1989; Ross et al. 1995).

    Reference:

    http://www.nwrel.org/cfc/publications/DAP2.html

    [quote="Kriselda Manzano"]Good eve,

    YEAH I think a developmentally
    appropriate curriculum is best,
    BUT the teacher in the next grade is
    not going to teach that way and I don’t want to confuse the children.


    After exerting a lot of effort to apply
    learner centered (LC) approach to your students, you found out that the next educator
    will not be using of the same method is frustrating. You might even feel furious
    and as a result you will not use the LC anymore because you think it’s just a
    waste of time and learners might be confused.

    I believe this is a normal reaction
    from an educator, but remember one must not compromise learning just because he
    thinks that there will be no proper reinforcement.
    [b][color=Black]Reference:

    Geist, E. & Baum, A., (2005). Yeah, But’s
    That Keep Teachers from Embracing an Active Curriculum Overcoming the
    Resistance. Young Children. Proquest Education Journals. 28-35
    avatar
    Divinia Joy Tuzon

    Posts : 65
    Join date : 2008-08-12

    Re: Discussion Forum 7

    Post  Divinia Joy Tuzon on Fri 22 Aug 2008, 1:16 am

    Sir Joel, I sincerely appreciate your thoughts.. I admire you for your willingness to change for your students and for being brave enough to admit that you're one of those frequently scolded by the coordinators at your school. But I agree that what matters most is that your students are able to understand and retain the knowledge you impart to them. Though students getting high grades and passing all of your exams may be flattering, it is not a valid reason for you to stick with your teaching style especially after we realize the uniqueness of each student as well as the differences in their learning styles. Though it may be challenging for you to implement the change and the strategies you want because of the resistance of the administration or the parents, for instance, pursuing and actively engaging them will make them embrace your idea. Good luck!


    silva731 wrote:Iam really moved with your material because iam the teacher who is always scolded by his coordinator because I usually dont finish the topics in the course outline becuase I always make sure they know the concept before we move to another. Quantity of what you have taught is irrelevant. What iam after is the retention my students get. And Iam really glad we have a subject like this because iam learning more.
    avatar
    silva731

    Posts : 35
    Join date : 2008-08-12

    Re: Discussion Forum 7

    Post  silva731 on Fri 22 Aug 2008, 1:21 am

    What challenging? It just so happen iam not sleeping well for 2 weeks because of this, hehehehe, Thanks! well its not the coordinator that will keep your job, its how the students evaluate you. As long as you know your doing your best for them to learn, every scolding I get is worth it.I know were quite off the thread already but I really do like the material.


    Divinia Joy Tuzon wrote:Sir Joel, I sincerely appreciate your thoughts.. I admire you for your willingness to change for your students and for being brave enough to admit that you're one of those frequently scolded by the coordinators at your school. But I agree that what matters most is that your students are able to understand and retain the knowledge you impart to them. Though students getting high grades and passing all of your exams may be flattering, it is not a valid reason for you to stick with your teaching style especially after we realize the uniqueness of each student as well as the differences in their learning styles. Though it may be challenging for you to implement the change and the strategies you want because of the resistance of the administration or the parents, for instance, pursuing and actively engaging them will make them embrace your idea. Good luck!


    silva731 wrote:Iam really moved with your material because iam the teacher who is always scolded by his coordinator because I usually dont finish the topics in the course outline becuase I always make sure they know the concept before we move to another. Quantity of what you have taught is irrelevant. What iam after is the retention my students get. And Iam really glad we have a subject like this because iam learning more.
    avatar
    silva731

    Posts : 35
    Join date : 2008-08-12

    Re: Discussion Forum 7

    Post  silva731 on Fri 22 Aug 2008, 1:24 am

    The only problem iam having is reading and giving feedbacks as consistent as possible. I still have to make a system for this to be easier, well i think i have to read more.

    silva731 wrote:What challenging? It just so happen iam not sleeping well for 2 weeks because of this, hehehehe, Thanks! well its not the coordinator that will keep your job, its how the students evaluate you. As long as you know your doing your best for them to learn, every scolding I get is worth it.I know were quite off the thread already but I really do like the material.


    Divinia Joy Tuzon wrote:Sir Joel, I sincerely appreciate your thoughts.. I admire you for your willingness to change for your students and for being brave enough to admit that you're one of those frequently scolded by the coordinators at your school. But I agree that what matters most is that your students are able to understand and retain the knowledge you impart to them. Though students getting high grades and passing all of your exams may be flattering, it is not a valid reason for you to stick with your teaching style especially after we realize the uniqueness of each student as well as the differences in their learning styles. Though it may be challenging for you to implement the change and the strategies you want because of the resistance of the administration or the parents, for instance, pursuing and actively engaging them will make them embrace your idea. Good luck!


    silva731 wrote:Iam really moved with your material because iam the teacher who is always scolded by his coordinator because I usually dont finish the topics in the course outline becuase I always make sure they know the concept before we move to another. Quantity of what you have taught is irrelevant. What iam after is the retention my students get. And Iam really glad we have a subject like this because iam learning more.
    avatar
    Kriselda Manzano

    Posts : 36
    Join date : 2008-08-12

    Re: Discussion Forum 7

    Post  Kriselda Manzano on Fri 22 Aug 2008, 1:25 am

    In the article written by Dunn and Kontos (1997) they deliberately mentioned that parents and teachers may not agree on the value of DAP. Helping parents understand the link between DAP and basic skill acquisition may prevent potential tensions between parents and teachers over instructional methods. The emotional costs of academically oriented classrooms, particularly for children from low-income, linguistically or culturally diverse groups, behoove the educators to make parents aware of the potential benefits of DAP.




    Reference:

    Dunn, L. & Kontos, S. (1997). Developmentally Appropriate Practice: What Does Research Tell Us? ERIC Digest. Retrieved August 21, 2008 from http://www.ericdigests.org/1998-1/practice.htm
    avatar
    Divinia Joy Tuzon

    Posts : 65
    Join date : 2008-08-12

    Re: Discussion Forum 7

    Post  Divinia Joy Tuzon on Fri 22 Aug 2008, 1:35 am

    Indeed Kris, early years are learning years. What children learn when they are young serves as the foundation for their future learnings and experiences . He or she will bring this hopefully throughout his or her entire life. Therefore, a strong foundation of knowledge and values is essential. Yes, though we cannot force our fellow colleagues to follow our strategies and principles, we can however influence them with our works and hopefully by becoming advocates, we introduce eventually the more appropriate practices to them.

    Kriselda Manzano wrote:Good eve,

    YEAH I think a developmentally
    appropriate curriculum is best,
    BUT the teacher in the next grade is
    not going to teach that way and I don’t want to confuse the children.

    For me this is one of the most critical
    issues that educators are facing today.

    After exerting a lot of effort to apply
    learner centered (LC) approach to your students, you found out that the next educator
    will not be using of the same method is frustrating. You might even feel furious
    and as a result you will not use the LC anymore because you think it’s just a
    waste of time and learners might be confused.

    I believe this is a normal reaction
    from an educator, but remember one must not compromise learning just because he
    thinks that there will be no proper reinforcement. As what Geist and Baum
    (2005) stated, positive classroom experience can never be negative. Educators
    should always bear in mind that giving a high quality of teaching and positive learning
    experience to the students will most likely result to high retention.

    As a future educator, I think one the principal
    job of the teacher to be a model to his colleagues and encourage them to
    practice a high quality of instruction (learner centered approach).


    Reference:
    Geist, E. & Baum, A., (2005). Yeah, But’s
    That Keep Teachers from Embracing an Active Curriculum Overcoming the
    Resistance. Young Children. Proquest Education Journals. 28-35




    Divinia Joy Tuzon wrote:Classmates, please relate your discussion with the following guide questions we provided:

    1.Among the eight challenges mentioned in the article that are encountered by educators in implementing the developmentally appropriate practice approach, what do you think is the most critical issue that educators are facing today and how can we respond to the "Yeah, But's" in our own curriculum?

    2.Knowing the advantages students receive from a learner-centered approach, do you think applying developmentally appropriate practice is feasible and more appropriate in our setting, considering:

    a.Absence of No Child Left Behind policy and organizations such as National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) that advocates such approach?

    b.The cost of applying multiage programs, child-initiated activities and project approach over the traditional “cookbook” curriculum?

    3.How can we as educators and would be educators overcome our own resistance and help others included in the education of our students such as our fellow colleagues, the administrators and most importantly the families of the students to do so also?

    Thank you very much and we are really looking forward for your opinions.
    God bless!
    avatar
    Divinia Joy Tuzon

    Posts : 65
    Join date : 2008-08-12

    Re: Discussion Forum 7

    Post  Divinia Joy Tuzon on Fri 22 Aug 2008, 2:03 am

    It's okay! I guess we're all experiencing the same thing. Anyway, going back to our topic, after realizing the resistance our educators are dealing with and after learning what we can do about it, do you think that adapting developmentally appropriate practice in our setting is feasible and appropriate? Considering what Kris also mentioned. Knowing the advantages of DAP to children as well as its cost compared to using the "cookbook" curriculum, do you think it is practical for those children coming from low-income families and those belonging in culturally diverse groups?

    silva731 wrote:The only problem iam having is reading and giving feedbacks as consistent as possible. I still have to make a system for this to be easier, well i think i have to read more.

    silva731 wrote:What challenging? It just so happen iam not sleeping well for 2 weeks because of this, hehehehe, Thanks! well its not the coordinator that will keep your job, its how the students evaluate you. As long as you know your doing your best for them to learn, every scolding I get is worth it.I know were quite off the thread already but I really do like the material.


    Divinia Joy Tuzon wrote:Sir Joel, I sincerely appreciate your thoughts.. I admire you for your willingness to change for your students and for being brave enough to admit that you're one of those frequently scolded by the coordinators at your school. But I agree that what matters most is that your students are able to understand and retain the knowledge you impart to them. Though students getting high grades and passing all of your exams may be flattering, it is not a valid reason for you to stick with your teaching style especially after we realize the uniqueness of each student as well as the differences in their learning styles. Though it may be challenging for you to implement the change and the strategies you want because of the resistance of the administration or the parents, for instance, pursuing and actively engaging them will make them embrace your idea. Good luck!


    silva731 wrote:Iam really moved with your material because iam the teacher who is always scolded by his coordinator because I usually dont finish the topics in the course outline becuase I always make sure they know the concept before we move to another. Quantity of what you have taught is irrelevant. What iam after is the retention my students get. And Iam really glad we have a subject like this because iam learning more.
    avatar
    silva731

    Posts : 35
    Join date : 2008-08-12

    Re: Discussion Forum 7

    Post  silva731 on Fri 22 Aug 2008, 2:12 am

    adapting this is really appropriate, especially to low income groups.Well good education is all their children got. with this approach we could provide education that only the rich could have. Well educating the poor properly is the only hope we have to improve the economy in the long run. It is feasible and very much appropriate especially here in our country.


    Divinia Joy Tuzon wrote:It's okay! I guess we're all experiencing the same thing. Anyway, going back to our topic, after realizing the resistance our educators are dealing with and after learning what we can do about it, do you think that adapting developmentally appropriate practice in our setting is feasible and appropriate? Considering what Kris also mentioned. Knowing the advantages of DAP to children as well as its cost compared to using the "cookbook" curriculum, do you think it is practical for those children coming from low-income families and those belonging in culturally diverse groups?

    silva731 wrote:The only problem iam having is reading and giving feedbacks as consistent as possible. I still have to make a system for this to be easier, well i think i have to read more.

    silva731 wrote:What challenging? It just so happen iam not sleeping well for 2 weeks because of this, hehehehe, Thanks! well its not the coordinator that will keep your job, its how the students evaluate you. As long as you know your doing your best for them to learn, every scolding I get is worth it.I know were quite off the thread already but I really do like the material.


    Divinia Joy Tuzon wrote:Sir Joel, I sincerely appreciate your thoughts.. I admire you for your willingness to change for your students and for being brave enough to admit that you're one of those frequently scolded by the coordinators at your school. But I agree that what matters most is that your students are able to understand and retain the knowledge you impart to them. Though students getting high grades and passing all of your exams may be flattering, it is not a valid reason for you to stick with your teaching style especially after we realize the uniqueness of each student as well as the differences in their learning styles. Though it may be challenging for you to implement the change and the strategies you want because of the resistance of the administration or the parents, for instance, pursuing and actively engaging them will make them embrace your idea. Good luck!


    silva731 wrote:Iam really moved with your material because iam the teacher who is always scolded by his coordinator because I usually dont finish the topics in the course outline becuase I always make sure they know the concept before we move to another. Quantity of what you have taught is irrelevant. What iam after is the retention my students get. And Iam really glad we have a subject like this because iam learning more.
    avatar
    silva731

    Posts : 35
    Join date : 2008-08-12

    Re: Discussion Forum 7

    Post  silva731 on Fri 22 Aug 2008, 2:16 am

    I know its a lot of work, but every great achievements came from a lot of hardwork capitalized by sweat and blood. if we want a country of intelligent and critical thinking people well we should start adapting this. Iam starting in my own ways somehow.


    silva731 wrote:adapting this is really appropriate, especially to low income groups.Well good education is all their children got. with this approach we could provide education that only the rich could have. Well educating the poor properly is the only hope we have to improve the economy in the long run. It is feasible and very much appropriate especially here in our country.


    Divinia Joy Tuzon wrote:It's okay! I guess we're all experiencing the same thing. Anyway, going back to our topic, after realizing the resistance our educators are dealing with and after learning what we can do about it, do you think that adapting developmentally appropriate practice in our setting is feasible and appropriate? Considering what Kris also mentioned. Knowing the advantages of DAP to children as well as its cost compared to using the "cookbook" curriculum, do you think it is practical for those children coming from low-income families and those belonging in culturally diverse groups?

    silva731 wrote:The only problem iam having is reading and giving feedbacks as consistent as possible. I still have to make a system for this to be easier, well i think i have to read more.

    silva731 wrote:What challenging? It just so happen iam not sleeping well for 2 weeks because of this, hehehehe, Thanks! well its not the coordinator that will keep your job, its how the students evaluate you. As long as you know your doing your best for them to learn, every scolding I get is worth it.I know were quite off the thread already but I really do like the material.


    Divinia Joy Tuzon wrote:Sir Joel, I sincerely appreciate your thoughts.. I admire you for your willingness to change for your students and for being brave enough to admit that you're one of those frequently scolded by the coordinators at your school. But I agree that what matters most is that your students are able to understand and retain the knowledge you impart to them. Though students getting high grades and passing all of your exams may be flattering, it is not a valid reason for you to stick with your teaching style especially after we realize the uniqueness of each student as well as the differences in their learning styles. Though it may be challenging for you to implement the change and the strategies you want because of the resistance of the administration or the parents, for instance, pursuing and actively engaging them will make them embrace your idea. Good luck!


    silva731 wrote:Iam really moved with your material because iam the teacher who is always scolded by his coordinator because I usually dont finish the topics in the course outline becuase I always make sure they know the concept before we move to another. Quantity of what you have taught is irrelevant. What iam after is the retention my students get. And Iam really glad we have a subject like this because iam learning more.
    avatar
    Cristina Mariano

    Posts : 24
    Join date : 2008-08-12
    Age : 32
    Location : Manila

    Re: Discussion Forum 7

    Post  Cristina Mariano on Fri 22 Aug 2008, 4:20 am

    Good Morning! Sorry for the late post.. I was reading all of your post and in fact, I am being enriched with the flow of discussion.

    Child education is undoubtedly the most crucial point in the education history of every person because it is where we establish our very own basics of knowledge, skills and attitude. Teachers handling young learners should critically choose the kind of pedagogical techniques he or she uses in teaching the class in a way that she attempts to address the needs of every child in her most capable way.

    Among the eight challenges mentioned in the article, in my opinion the most critical issue that educators face is the challenge to consistency of the kind of teaching approach educators use. Consistency means that educators utilize a patterned approach in teaching which suits the learning structure of the children. Exposing the kids to this kind of approach will allow them ample time to adjust and cope up to the learning process being introduced by the teachers.

    Teachers who are the persons most familiar with the children’s abilities, needs and interest can best create a very suitable instructional plan patterned according to their student’s needs and capabilities. Sticking to the Patterned or structured curriculum will not only limit teachers and students explore the realms of learning meaningful and bountiful knowledge the world offers. Teachers in their best position should act upon and deserves to be heard for it is they which shapes the future of these young minds.

    I guess educators can be able to overcome these resistance if they keep a positive attitude and set aside their personal “but’s” instead, focus on the children’s needs and determine what they can do more for sculpture the minds of these learners. Families are partners in the learning process which act as helping hands of the educators in reinforcing the learnings children derived from school. Thus, each of us is vital in the consistency of the children’s learning. All of us are accountable not only educators in schools but more importantly acknowledge our roles as educators of these youngsters at home.


    Divinia Joy Tuzon wrote:Classmates, please relate your discussion with the following guide questions we provided:

    1.Among the eight challenges mentioned in the article that are encountered by educators in implementing the developmentally appropriate practice approach, what do you think is the most critical issue that educators are facing today and how can we respond to the "Yeah, But's" in our own curriculum?

    2.Knowing the advantages students receive from a learner-centered approach, do you think applying developmentally appropriate practice is feasible and more appropriate in our setting, considering:

    a.Absence of No Child Left Behind policy and organizations such as National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) that advocates such approach?

    b.The cost of applying multiage programs, child-initiated activities and project approach over the traditional “cookbook” curriculum?

    3.How can we as educators and would be educators overcome our own resistance and help others included in the education of our students such as our fellow colleagues, the administrators and most importantly the families of the students to do so also?

    Thank you very much and we are really looking forward for your opinions.
    God bless!
    avatar
    Cristina Mariano

    Posts : 24
    Join date : 2008-08-12
    Age : 32
    Location : Manila

    Re: Discussion Forum 7

    Post  Cristina Mariano on Fri 22 Aug 2008, 4:26 am

    I believe so, in fact, as I have observed among the people I know who do excellent in school have the very utmost support of their families. It not only boost the confidence of the child but also, get accustomed of studying with continuous assistance of the parents and the entire family which leads to optimum learning development.

    It is clear that the family is not only the nucleus of civilization, as historian Will Durant observed, but also the key to education (Boyer, 1991). Early intervention research demonstrates the vital importance of family involvement. Researchers have found that the earlier in a child's educational process family involvement begins; the more robust the benefits will be (Epstein, 1992). Perhaps the most powerful form of parental involvement occurs when parents are actively engaged with the child at home in ways that lead to optimal development
    .
    avatar
    Cristina Mariano

    Posts : 24
    Join date : 2008-08-12
    Age : 32
    Location : Manila

    Re: Discussion Forum 7

    Post  Cristina Mariano on Fri 22 Aug 2008, 4:43 am

    It is indeed adaptable in our educational setup here considering the fact that we need an appropriate practice to produce a competent education system. Acknowledging low income groups should not hinder us to continually strive for a better educational system but it impost a big challenge as to how can we adapt an appropriate practice set up despite the socio-economical stance of our country.

    silva731 wrote:adapting this is really appropriate, especially to low income groups.Well good education is all their children got. with this approach we could provide education that only the rich could have. Well educating the poor properly is the only hope we have to improve the economy in the long run. It is feasible and very much appropriate especially here in our country.


    Divinia Joy Tuzon wrote:It's okay! I guess we're all experiencing the same thing. Anyway, going back to our topic, after realizing the resistance our educators are dealing with and after learning what we can do about it, do you think that adapting developmentally appropriate practice in our setting is feasible and appropriate? Considering what Kris also mentioned. Knowing the advantages of DAP to children as well as its cost compared to using the "cookbook" curriculum, do you think it is practical for those children coming from low-income families and those belonging in culturally diverse groups?

    silva731 wrote:The only problem iam having is reading and giving feedbacks as consistent as possible. I still have to make a system for this to be easier, well i think i have to read more.

    silva731 wrote:What challenging? It just so happen iam not sleeping well for 2 weeks because of this, hehehehe, Thanks! well its not the coordinator that will keep your job, its how the students evaluate you. As long as you know your doing your best for them to learn, every scolding I get is worth it.I know were quite off the thread already but I really do like the material.


    Divinia Joy Tuzon wrote:Sir Joel, I sincerely appreciate your thoughts.. I admire you for your willingness to change for your students and for being brave enough to admit that you're one of those frequently scolded by the coordinators at your school. But I agree that what matters most is that your students are able to understand and retain the knowledge you impart to them. Though students getting high grades and passing all of your exams may be flattering, it is not a valid reason for you to stick with your teaching style especially after we realize the uniqueness of each student as well as the differences in their learning styles. Though it may be challenging for you to implement the change and the strategies you want because of the resistance of the administration or the parents, for instance, pursuing and actively engaging them will make them embrace your idea. Good luck!


    silva731 wrote:Iam really moved with your material because iam the teacher who is always scolded by his coordinator because I usually dont finish the topics in the course outline becuase I always make sure they know the concept before we move to another. Quantity of what you have taught is irrelevant. What iam after is the retention my students get. And Iam really glad we have a subject like this because iam learning more.
    avatar
    luder

    Posts : 42
    Join date : 2008-08-12

    Re: Discussion Forum 7

    Post  luder on Fri 22 Aug 2008, 5:06 am





    YEAH I would like to teach this way.

    BUT my school district requires that I teach using a prepared curriculum.

    Sounds familiar!? Let see if we can help without giving advice this time.

    The first challenge that got my attention was the one regarding the parents and the teachers having different views about the children’s education. But then I thought, even with the willingness of the teacher and the support of the parents to go with DAP. It won’t be possible if certain policies dictate the opposite.

    Unless they have a school of their own, then it may be possible to go further and deal with the other challenges. We can always advocate to implement programs such as DAP but as long as the policy making bodies view the situation differently, how far can we go?

    A lot of things are messed up in our educational system. Sure the people up there are doing what they think is best, but do they really know for sure?

    Feasibility, we’re talking about money and other resources. Being in a third world country, we can’t always rely on the government to act on our behalf. Maybe there is a chance for programs like this to happen in the Philippines. If we can gather enough people who will support such an endeavor, then it is possible. Probably big schools like La Salle or Ateneo can spearhead such a movement. I’m sure that given the noble nature of this undertaking people will follow suite and support it. Maybe even get the powers that be to take notice.

    As Michael Jackson would put it, let’s start with “The Man in the Mirror”! I admire sir joel for going out of the box and doing what he thinks is best for his students. If we could all be like that, but not in an anarchistic way, there is a chance that one by one, teacher after teacher, change might happen.




    avatar
    evancarlo

    Posts : 53
    Join date : 2008-08-12

    Re: Discussion Forum 7

    Post  evancarlo on Fri 22 Aug 2008, 6:01 am

    Establishing reciprocal relationships with families

    Developmentally appropriate practices derive from deep knowledge of individual children and the context within which they develop and learn. The younger the child, the more necessary it is for professionals to acquire this knowledge through relationships with children's families. The traditional approach to families has been a parent education orientation in which the professionals see themselves as knowing what is best for children and view parents as needing to be educated. There is also the limited view of parent involvement that sees PTA membership as the primary goal. These approaches do not adequately convey the complexity of the partnership between teachers and parents that is a fundamental element of good practice (Powell 1994).

    When the parent education approach is criticized in favor of a more family-centered approach, this shift may be misunderstood to mean that parents dictate all program content and professionals abdicate responsibility, doing whatever parents want regardless of whether professionals agree that it is in children's best interest. Either of these extremes oversimplifies the importance of relationships with families and fails to provide the kind of environment in which parents and professionals work together to achieve shared goals for children; such programs with this focus are characterized by at least the following guidelines for practice:

    A. Reciprocal relationships between teachers and families require mutual respect, cooperation, shared responsibility, and negotiation of conflicts toward achievement of shared goals.

    B. Early childhood teachers work in collaborative partnerships with families, establishing and maintaining regular, frequent two-way communication with children's parents.

    C. Parents are welcome in the program and participate in decisions about their children's care and education. Parents observe and participate and serve in decision making roles in the program.

    D. Teachers acknowledge parents' choices and goals for children and respond with sensitivity and respect to parents' preferences and concerns without abdicating professional responsibility to children.

    E. Teachers and parents share their knowledge of the child and understanding of children's development and learning as part of day-to-day communication and planned conferences. Teachers support families in ways that maximally promote family decision making capabilities and competence.

    F. To ensure more accurate and complete information, the program involves families in assessing and planning for individual children.

    G. The program links families with a range of services, based on identified resources, priorities, and concerns.

    H. Teachers, parents, programs, social service and health agencies, and consultants who may have educational responsibility for the child at different times should, with family participation, share developmental information about children as they pass from one level of a program to another.

    Reference:

    http://www.nwrel.org/cfc/publications/DAP2.html




    luder wrote:



    YEAH I would like to teach this way.

    BUT my school district requires that I teach using a prepared curriculum.

    Sounds familiar!? Let see if we can help without giving advice this time.

    The first challenge that got my attention was the one regarding the parents and the teachers having different views about the children’s education. But then I thought, even with the willingness of the teacher and the support of the parents to go with DAP. It won’t be possible if certain policies dictate the opposite.

    Unless they have a school of their own, then it may be possible to go further and deal with the other challenges. We can always advocate to implement programs such as DAP but as long as the policy making bodies view the situation differently, how far can we go?

    A lot of things are messed up in our educational system. Sure the people up there are doing what they think is best, but do they really know for sure?

    Feasibility, we’re talking about money and other resources. Being in a third world country, we can’t always rely on the government to act on our behalf. Maybe there is a chance for programs like this to happen in the Philippines. If we can gather enough people who will support such an endeavor, then it is possible. Probably big schools like La Salle or Ateneo can spearhead such a movement. I’m sure that given the noble nature of this undertaking people will follow suite and support it. Maybe even get the powers that be to take notice.

    As Michael Jackson would put it, let’s start with “The Man in the Mirror”! I admire sir joel for going out of the box and doing what he thinks is best for his students. If we could all be like that, but not in an anarchistic way, there is a chance that one by one, teacher after teacher, change might happen.




    avatar
    Josh

    Posts : 41
    Join date : 2008-08-11

    Re: Discussion Forum 7

    Post  Josh on Fri 22 Aug 2008, 6:55 am

    Good morning. Talking about involvement of family and coordiation of parents and teachers in achieving the goals of learne-centered approach, I come to realize that teachers' role is really a great burden and a noble profession. As the saying goes " teachers are the second parent," and to top it all values formation of a student is formed in school. Sometimes student even disagree with their own parents because of strong influence of the values inculcated to them by, first teachers and then the values acquired by the student from the values of the institution. furthermore, parents should be, in the same manner, adopt the method of learner-centered approach in dealing with their chilren to avoid conflict and resistance. " Our belief arre shaped by our values, determined by how we interact with people and issues, as manifested by our actions." Parents-teacher collaboration will then a big boost in launching this method in the Philippine educational system.
    Cristina Mariano wrote:I believe so, in fact, as I have observed among the people I know who do excellent in school have the very utmost support of their families. It not only boost the confidence of the child but also, get accustomed of studying with continuous assistance of the parents and the entire family which leads to optimum learning development. Going back to the point exhausted earlier, parents orientation or re-orientation of what is being proposed by learner-centered approach is critical and sholud be given utmost concern if we are to advocate this teaching strategy.quote]It is clear that the family is not only the nucleus of civilization, as historian Will Durant observed, but also the key to education (Boyer, 1991). Early intervention research demonstrates the vital importance of family involvement. Researchers have found that the earlier in a child's educational process family involvement begins; the more robust the benefits will be (Epstein, 1992). Perhaps the most powerful form of parental involvement occurs when parents are actively engaged with the child at home in ways that lead to optimal development
    .[/quote]
    avatar
    yvette

    Posts : 28
    Join date : 2008-08-12

    Re: Discussion Forum 7

    Post  yvette on Fri 22 Aug 2008, 7:35 am

    DAP views learning as the interactive process of the child exploring his/her environment. It is the teacher's responsibility to provide a stimulating environment and interesting materials to encourage exploration. It is important that the environment, activities provided, and the attitudes of the staff reflect an understanding of the diverse backgrounds and cultures the children and families may bring to the setting. Each child's background and culture should be valued and acknowledged, not by holding 'theme' weeks, but rather, by reflecting aspects of their background or culture through the books, toys, and other activities and displays available throughout the classroom environment.

    Family participation and parent involvement can do much to enhance the child's learning experience. It is important for early childhood educators to recognize that parents are the child's first and most important teachers. Parents must play an active role in their child's education to ensure a quality experience for the child. Teaching Research keeps an open door policy which encourages parents to visit the center anytime. They will often visit at lunch time, during special activities or circle time. Communication between the program and the family is also a vital component for the child's success. Examples of parent communication systems used at Teaching Research include:
    • a parent center with a bulletin board for imparting information
    • regular newsletters
    • informal notes home
    • face to face updates on how their child did that day when parents pick them up (focusing on positive aspects as much as possible)
    • phone calls
    Parent events also bridge the home-school gap. These events are scheduled at various times of day to accommodate parents' busy schedules. Take-home projects are made available for parents who are unable to attend the various parent events scheduled during the day. These family projects are worked on at home and then shared by the child in school.

    Reference/s: Mandy Stanley, Early Childhood & Training Dept. http://www.tr.wou.edu/train/cdcDAP.htm
    avatar
    yvette

    Posts : 28
    Join date : 2008-08-12

    Re: Discussion Forum 7

    Post  yvette on Fri 22 Aug 2008, 8:11 am

    morning too.
    According to Stanley, "We believe that children are active learners and unique individuals. They learn in a developmental sequence, progressing at their own pace. The integrated setting should be arranged to stimulate acquisition of competencies in communication, cognition and social skills." In our past discussions, I think the learner-centered approach is most beneficial. This is evident in the Philippine setting. I agree with you when you say that parent-teacher collaboration will be of great issue. UERM, for example, is distinct with other universities especially the government owned, due to thye family participation as enveloped in their curriculum for the development and enhancement of the student. I think this concept should be incorporated by other institutions since it has brought evidently competitive, good and smart students.
    Josh wrote:Good morning. Talking about involvement of family and coordiation of parents and teachers in achieving the goals of learne-centered approach, I come to realize that teachers' role is really a great burden and a noble profession. As the saying goes " teachers are the second parent," and to top it all values formation of a student is formed in school. Sometimes student even disagree with their own parents because of strong influence of the values inculcated to them by, first teachers and then the values acquired by the student from the values of the institution. furthermore, parents should be, in the same manner, adopt the method of learner-centered approach in dealing with their chilren to avoid conflict and resistance. " Our belief arre shaped by our values, determined by how we interact with people and issues, as manifested by our actions." Parents-teacher collaboration will then a big boost in launching this method in the Philippine educational system.
    Cristina Mariano wrote:I believe so, in fact, as I have observed among the people I know who do excellent in school have the very utmost support of their families. It not only boost the confidence of the child but also, get accustomed of studying with continuous assistance of the parents and the entire family which leads to optimum learning development. Going back to the point exhausted earlier, parents orientation or re-orientation of what is being proposed by learner-centered approach is critical and sholud be given utmost concern if we are to advocate this teaching strategy.quote]It is clear that the family is not only the nucleus of civilization, as historian Will Durant observed, but also the key to education (Boyer, 1991). Early intervention research demonstrates the vital importance of family involvement. Researchers have found that the earlier in a child's educational process family involvement begins; the more robust the benefits will be (Epstein, 1992). Perhaps the most powerful form of parental involvement occurs when parents are actively engaged with the child at home in ways that lead to optimal development
    .
    [/quote]
    avatar
    Kriselda Manzano

    Posts : 36
    Join date : 2008-08-12

    Re: Discussion Forum 7

    Post  Kriselda Manzano on Fri 22 Aug 2008, 9:06 am

    There are advantages in applying the
    multiage programs in the classroom, a
    research on multiage classrooms
    has consistently found that such heterogeneous groupings encourage and invite
    cooperation and pro-social behaviors, such as giving, sharing, taking turns,
    and sensitivity to others (Chase & Doan, 1994; Katz, Evangelou &
    Hartman, 1993; Pratt, 1986).

    Being with the same teacher and classmates for at least two years, children
    have the opportunity to develop friendships with other children, to establish a
    trusting relationship with the teacher or teachers, and become familiar with
    the expectations of the classroom. In fact, research overwhelmingly favors
    multiage grouping because of its positive effects on children's social and
    emotional development and on the classroom climate (Cotton, 1993).

    Therefore multiage programs create more positive
    school-related attitudes and can greatly influence the performance of the
    learners.




    Reference:
    Novick, R. (1996). Developmentally
    Appropriate and Culturally Responsive Education:
    Theory in Practice. Retrieved August 21, 2008 from http://www.nwrel.org/cfc/publications/DAP2.html#Grouping




    Divinia Joy Tuzon wrote:Classmates, please relate your discussion with the following guide questions we provided:

    1.Among the eight challenges mentioned in the article that are encountered by educators in implementing the developmentally appropriate practice approach, what do you think is the most critical issue that educators are facing today and how can we respond to the "Yeah, But's" in our own curriculum?

    2.Knowing the advantages students receive from a learner-centered approach, do you think applying developmentally appropriate practice is feasible and more appropriate in our setting, considering:

    a.Absence of No Child Left Behind policy and organizations such as National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) that advocates such approach?

    b.The cost of applying multiage programs, child-initiated activities and project approach over the traditional “cookbook” curriculum?

    3.How can we as educators and would be educators overcome our own resistance and help others included in the education of our students such as our fellow colleagues, the administrators and most importantly the families of the students to do so also?

    Thank you very much and we are really looking forward for your opinions.
    God bless!
    avatar
    gary.orosa

    Posts : 19
    Join date : 2008-08-12

    Re: Discussion Forum 7

    Post  gary.orosa on Fri 22 Aug 2008, 6:16 pm

    We as educators and would be educators can overcome our own resistance and help others included in the education of our students by keeping in mind that we always want to always put the child's needs first if we are learner centered.

    Ideally the change must come from within the teacher and the change must not be because of some external pressure or force.

    Being an educator is a vocation and to be a teacher, one must be dedicated to the profession and must be willing to do anything for the student to learn.

    Sponsored content

    Re: Discussion Forum 7

    Post  Sponsored content


      Current date/time is Thu 21 Mar 2019, 12:05 am