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    Remember the Hokage...

    PriNcE RJ
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    Post  PriNcE RJ on Fri 22 Oct 2010, 2:17 pm

    Tet Soriano wrote:Thank you for sharing your experience with us Mr.RJ. Reading about your post, my eyes were opened in seeing how Philippines lack authentic leaders in the nursing field. I have heard stories like yours that nurses on higher positions would not want their staffs to go on higher education because they are afraid that someone will take their place.

    Thank you for commending my work. As I said, my experience is my sole contribution to this topic. Although I don't want to make an antagonistic stereotype on our superiors, who mostly are still worthy of their positions and are much respected, the fact still remains that there are people who are being corrupted by their titles.

    Tet Soriano wrote:With leaders waiting for opportunity, probably they lack confidence to take the place. Knowing the setting in the Philippines, nurses working in a hospital for a long time cat like they are permanent to that position. In addition, most of the management look at length of experience as gauge for leadership capabilities.

    The challenges of leadership are so great these days that many ask whether it's worth taking on a leadership role. This issue of "America's Best Leaders" tells the stories of people who said yes. They are, as Teddy Roosevelt said, "in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood ... who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions ... knows in the end the triumph of high achievement" that can come only by "daring greatly." (George B., 2006)
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    Post  PriNcE RJ on Fri 22 Oct 2010, 12:50 pm

    Charis Juan wrote:It is difficult to find an authentic leader, on the basis of Wong’s definition of what it is. Aside from having the essential trait of self-awareness, there are the self-regulatory processes of unbiased processing of information, authentic behaviour, and relational transparency. On top of these, the leader has to be able to generate a feeling of hope and trust from his followers, and he has to have positive emotions and optimism with his followers. But, I have seen a person who is highly aware of his strengths and weaknesses, his values and beliefs. I have seen him admit to his mistakes, though in private. I have seen him in action and know that his actions have been in rhyme with his values. I have seen how he has taken unpopular stance, undaunted by what critics would say because he believes it would yield more benefits to the organization and the people that constitute it. I have seen him relate with his employees and know how they almost never want him to stop talking so they can learn more, and how he has constantly updated them of the organization’s state, and how they’ve admired the way he has governed them, how the employees would want to be early for work to be able to produce more output, to readily follow office rules, to participate in office activities, and to have grown concerned about their co-employees. I have known of the transformation of an organization because of the leadership of one man. Yes, he has become infectious as his employees have become a mirror of him, optimistic, hopeful, resilient and transparent. Do I consider him an authentic leader? I consider him the closest I can think of as an authentic leader, with his faults and shortcomings and all. Does he know that he is an authentic leader? He thinks leading is a responsibility and commitment, and therefore acts according to what he thinks is right. He knows he has influenced his employees to achieve more than they had imagined they would.

    It is not impossible to see an authentic leader. But it is increasingly difficult to see one in recent times because of the culture of, as you said, crab mentality, the system of red tape, and the tolerated practice of corruption. Many people are already leaders, even without the title, but to actually occupy a position of authority and power takes commitment. An authentic leader does not hesitate because he is confident of himself and his capabilities. . .

    I have nothing more to say... Crying or Very sad

    lol!

    I am really moved by this man. Just by reading your testimonial of him, I feel like I'm being influenced by him not just to be a good authentic leader but to be a good authentic person as a whole.

    I agree in this statement by Bill George in his article Truly Authentic Leader: "Search committees and voters alike fall into the trap of choosing leaders for their style rather than their substance, for their image instead of their integrity. Given this way of doing business, why should we be surprised when our leaders come up short?"
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    Post  PriNcE RJ on Fri 22 Oct 2010, 12:44 pm

    therese_132409 wrote:authentic leaders possess true innate values in line with their actions which can further attain trust from the followers and able to build a good relationship for a healthy work environment and achieve leader-follower personal development.
    there are people who are risk-takers, and the "play safe" ones. every human differs in actions and insights. some don't feel empowered to take change maybe because they remain contented on what they see. some would just say come what may. some would ignore what they witnessed is/are wrong because it is a waste of time and ignore it. they might not want to involve themselves in it because it will be an additional problem or worry for them. and maybe because they he/she will not be the only affected but also the others and might lose their job. some are coward to make his or her stand again because when he or she did it, nothing happened. the leaders or the boss just ignored him and nothing changed from what he observed was unfair.
    i believe that authentic leaders know who they are but also, he/ she should know who his/her members are to be an effective leader.

    What a great insight you've shared with us. It takes courage to speak up like that, because it takes courage to tell the truth in a world full of lies. Wink
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    Post  PriNcE RJ on Fri 22 Oct 2010, 12:33 pm

    chel_calvelo wrote: That was a good discussion!. You have related the article to your experience.

    Well, taking aside all the citations and intellectual talk, I think my experience would be my most significant share in this topic. My intention was not to degrade anyone but to make current leaders realize that "hey, I might be screwing up in handling my subordinates because my position got my head so inflated that I can only see my head." And to remind future leaders that "some of my predecessors where hated because they absorbed so much of themselves. I must not turn on that path and be like them."
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    Post  PriNcE RJ on Fri 22 Oct 2010, 12:25 pm

    AntonJayTan wrote:The title of your article really caught my attention. Not all may know naruto or even hokage. Very Happy

    Exactly. My purpose was not to make anime-literate people to thrive in my thread, and true enough, I've never even mentioned the Hokage in my discussion. I thought that by letting others who don't know who he is search for him, the realization of who he is and what he does will be more fruitful. I want to give them this "AHA moment" whenever they realize why I entitled my work as such. Wink
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    Post  PriNcE RJ on Fri 22 Oct 2010, 12:13 pm

    edliwag wrote: Loss of confidence, hope and lack of trust is probbaly the answer to your question on why some people are afraid to take charge. They feel that the chances of them having a positive influence on someone and making a difference in the world they live in just dont stand a chance with the kind of leaders they have.

    I would like to completely site the statement where I acquired the phrase in my question: The good news is that there is no shortage of people with the capacity to lead. There are leaders throughout organizations just waiting for the opportunity. In too many organizations, however, people don't feel empowered to take charge, "nor are they rewarded for doing so." (George B., 2006)

    I think the essence of reward still has its issues. Being a leader requires great responsibility, and in holding such responsibility, I think it's human nature to search for an equally great reward.
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    Post  Tet Soriano on Fri 22 Oct 2010, 12:08 pm

    Thank you for sharing your experience with us Mr.RJ. Reading about your post, my eyes were opened in seeing how Philippines lack authentic leaders in the nursing field. I have heard stories like yours that nurses on higher positions would not want their staffs to go on higher education because they are afraid that someone will take their place. Is it because they admit that these young nurses are more capable and skillful than them eventhough they do not have as much experience as they have?
    These nurses aren't authentic leaders. Authentic leaders do not have crab mentality because according to Wong, they must enhance their followers to improve at work. With their leadership, they become blockage to work enhancement.

    With leaders waiting for opportunity, probably they lack confidence to take the place. Knowing the setting in the Philippines, nurses working in a hospital for a long time cat like they are permanent to that position. In addition, most of the management look at length of experience as gauge for leadership capabilities.

    Authentic leaders know who they really are because one of the basic components of this theory is SELF-AWARENESS.
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    Post  cezzy on Fri 22 Oct 2010, 12:07 pm


    There are leaders throughout organizations just waiting for the opportunity. In too many organizations, however, people don't feel empowered to take charge. Why do you think so?


    The restructuring of health care organizations and the consequent redesign of the roles of managers has left those who remain, with limited time and power to influence change or articulate the concerns of nursing within institutions (Patrick & Spence-Laschinger, 2006). This has the potential to lead to manager role frustration and burnout. In addition, middle level managers lack time for mentoring first line nurse managers (FLNM), this hinders the development and retention of the FLNM population and hinders the ability to attract those staff with leadership potential to leadership roles (Patrick & Spence-Laschinger). A lot of consideration actually might be the reason why people, particularly nurses, don’t feel empowered to take charge. However, from the aspect of role per se, as what have discussed by Patrick and Spence-Laschinger (2006), the fast changing roles contributes to some nurse managers not being able to communicate effectively to their subordinates the responsibilities that should be shared to staff with leadership potentials. This might be one of the reasons behind leaders having less confidence on taking an action and taking charge of the situation.

    “Authentic leaders know who they are.” Do you believe this quotation? Whether your answer is yes or no, please render us your thought.

    Yes, I think authentic leaders really know who they are. However, validation of the person’s assumption that he/she is an authentic leader can only be perceived by his/her followers. Goffee and Jones (2005) made an emphasis that a leader cannot define own self as an authentic leader. Only the people who experience the leader can ascribe authenticity to the leader. Authenticity is only perceived by others. At some point in our lives, we might have been an authentic leader. Authentic leadership makes a difference in organizations by helping people to find meaning at work, build optimism and commitment among followers, encourage transparent relationships that build trust, and promote inclusive and positive ethical climates (Avolio and Gardner, 2005). We might have thought that the definition that was presented were present in us, however, your follower can be the best person in ascribing that you are really an authentic one.


    Reference:

    Patrick, A., & Spence-Laschinger, H. (2006). The effect of structural empowerment and perceived organizational support on middle level nurse managers' role satisfaction. Journal of Nursing Management, 14, 13-22. 66

    Spence-Laschinger, H. (2008). Effect of empowerment on professional practice environments, work satisfaction, and patient care quality: further testing the nursing worklife model. Journal of Nursing Care Quality, 23(4), 322-330.

    Goffee, R., & Jones, G. (2005). Managing authenticity. Harvard Business Review, 83(12), 85-94.



    PriNcE RJ
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    Post  PriNcE RJ on Fri 22 Oct 2010, 12:04 pm

    khayee_07 wrote:

    Laughing Laughing
    i was struck by your title! Laughing Laughing funny, 'cause i don't know if my thoughts coincide with yours! Laughing is this "HOKAGE" thingy your trying to convey is the one in NARUTO??? confused Laughing Laughing

    Yes, the Hokage that I'm pertaining to is the comical character in the Japanese animation Naruto and Naruto Shippuuden. It may be childish for me to inculcate it to my discussion but I want to give my paper a certain twist that would differ it from others. I knew that a lot of us would discuss about the authentic leadership theory as it was written, so I wouldn't want to contribute in the redundancy, no pun intended. Smile

    The Hokage (esp. the 3rd Hokage/Sandaime) is a stature of leadership in the animation that I've mentioned. Everyone looks up to him not only because he's the strongest but because he instilled values and virtues to each and everyone in the city. He was not an autonomous leader, he valued what others think. He was very accomodating to budding leaders and helped nourish them to be the ideal and most effective leaders of their generation. He protected everyone at the cost of his life and have fought at the forefront even though he holds the highest position. He was not afraid to let go of everything he had when it meant to save all the others. That is why my title is "Remember the Hokage..." cat
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    Post  mariekathleensantos on Fri 22 Oct 2010, 10:29 am

    Asfor me, Wong and Cummings did a great job on this matter. it was stated in the study thatthe qualities of an authentic leader can also be applied in the otherleadership styles. Ergo the improved version of all types of leader is theauthentic leader.
    Researchers define authenticleaders as “those individuals who are deeply aware of how they thinkand behave andare perceivedby othersas beingaware of their own and others’ values/ moral perspective, knowledge,and strengths,aware ofthe contextin which they operate, and who are confident,hopeful, optimistic,resilient, and high on moral character.” I certainly agree with this conceptsince being authentic means being true and if you are true, and righteous, itwill reflect on the environment you are into.


    Avolio BJ, GardnerWL, Walumbwa FO, Luthans F, May DR. Unlockingthemask: a look at the process bywhich authentic leaders impact followerattitudes Like a Star @ heaven
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    Post  aimee on Fri 22 Oct 2010, 10:20 am


    The whole packaging of the authentic leadership theory by Wong and Cumming, collectively, is considered to be unique. The elements, individually, were based on the basic concepts of old leadership theories.

    Authentic leaders speak the truth and lead from the heart, they are courageous and have rich moral fiber.They are dreamers and build teams and create communities. They deepen themselves and care for themselves. They commit to excellence rather than perfection. They leave a legacy and live in the hearts of the people around them. For them Success is wonderful but significance is even better.

    It is really hard to claim that one is a full-pledged authentic leader, but it is never too late. We can all hope and aim to become one and be the best of what we can be. Becoming an authentic leader can not be done overnight. It will take some time and experience to be able to learn and evolve. But as nurses that we are, I believe that deep inside, within ourselves, authenticity exist just waiting for the right time to ripen and be awakened.

    Several factors should be considered to become effective leader. One can have the qualities of a good leader but other forces can affect ones performance. Such as corruption, red tape etc. Our country is flooded with great leaders but we lack authentic ones.

    Robin S. Sharma, LL.M., http://www.selfgrowth.com


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    Post  AC Ver on Fri 22 Oct 2010, 4:49 am

    I think Wong and Cummings have done a good job in discussing what authentic leadership is in their article ‘Authentic leadership: a new theory for nursing or back to basics?’ and furthermore mentioning its strengths and weaknesses and at the same time comparing it to other theories. Through their article I was able to critique the authentic leadership theory by looking on its significance in the current time. However, the numerous citations on the meaning of authentic leadership got me a little confused. Well I guess various meanings are really needed since authentic leadership is a theory that takes into consideration many aspects of a leader.

    Other people may not be empowered for the reason of what the current system is presenting them, they may find the delinquencies happening in the nursing practice environments already ‘hopeless’. Moreover, they might have the fear of stepping up or the alarm of having the great portion of responsibility when asked to be in charge not only of their actions but of their whole staff members as well. In relation to authentic leadership, some could possibly still not have developed self-awareness for them to know what their purpose really is. Before one can find his purpose, he must first understand himself, his passions, and his underlying motivations (Bass & Steidlmeier, 1999). I think yes, authentic leaders know who they are because they have developed self-awareness just as what the various citations on the article have mentioned on the meaning of being an authentic leader.

    References:

    Bass, B. M., & Steidlmeier, P. (1999). Ethics, character, and authentic transformational leadership behavior. The Leadership Quarterly, 10, 181–217.
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    Post  cpenuliar on Fri 22 Oct 2010, 2:11 am

    “Authentic leaders know who they are.”

    Authentic leaders know themselves intimately. They deepen themselves. The job of the leader is to go deep. They nurture a strong self-relationship. They know their weaknesses and play to their strengths. And they always spend a lot of time transcending their fears.

    Remember that one aspect of Authentic Leadership is Self Awareness. Understanding one’s thoughts, beliefs and values and how these influence one’s mental and emotional states. Being aware of the effect that we have on others and understanding how our words and actions may affect others to the extent of having the meta-cognitive capacity to be able to predict one’s own thinking processes and subsequent behaviors and those of other people.
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    Post  Charis Juan on Thu 21 Oct 2010, 9:35 pm

    It is difficult to find an authentic leader, on the basis of Wong’s definition of what it is. Aside from having the essential trait of self-awareness, there are the self-regulatory processes of unbiased processing of information, authentic behaviour, and relational transparency. On top of these, the leader has to be able to generate a feeling of hope and trust from his followers, and he has to have positive emotions and optimism with his followers. But, I have seen a person who is highly aware of his strengths and weaknesses, his values and beliefs. I have seen him admit to his mistakes, though in private. I have seen him in action and know that his actions have been in rhyme with his values. I have seen how he has taken unpopular stance, undaunted by what critics would say because he believes it would yield more benefits to the organization and the people that constitute it. I have seen him relate with his employees and know how they almost never want him to stop talking so they can learn more, and how he has constantly updated them of the organization’s state, and how they’ve admired the way he has governed them, how the employees would want to be early for work to be able to produce more output, to readily follow office rules, to participate in office activities, and to have grown concerned about their co-employees. I have known of the transformation of an organization because of the leadership of one man. Yes, he has become infectious as his employees have become a mirror of him, optimistic, hopeful, resilient and transparent. Do I consider him an authentic leader? I consider him the closest I can think of as an authentic leader, with his faults and shortcomings and all. Does he know that he is an authentic leader? He thinks leading is a responsibility and commitment, and therefore acts according to what he thinks is right. He knows he has influenced his employees to achieve more than they had imagined they would.

    It is not impossible to see an authentic leader. But it is increasingly difficult to see one in recent times because of the culture of, as you said, crab mentality, the system of red tape, and the tolerated practice of corruption. Many people are already leaders, even without the title, but to actually occupy a position of authority and power takes commitment. An authentic leader does not hesitate because he is confident of himself and his capabilities. . .
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    Post  therese_132409 on Thu 21 Oct 2010, 6:41 pm

    authentic leaders possess true innate values in line with their actions which can further attain trust from the followers and able to build a good relationship for a healthy work environment and achieve leader-follower personal development.
    there are people who are risk-takers, and the "play safe" ones. every human differs in actions and insights. some don't feel empowered to take change maybe because they remain contented on what they see. some would just say come what may. some would ignore what they witnessed is/are wrong because it is a waste of time and ignore it. they might not want to involve themselves in it because it will be an additional problem or worry for them. and maybe because they he/she will not be the only affected but also the others and might lose their job. some are coward to make his or her stand again because when he or she did it, nothing happened. the leaders or the boss just ignored him and nothing changed from what he observed was unfair.
    i believe that authentic leaders know who they are but also, he/ she should know who his/her members are to be an effective leader.
    chel_calvelo
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    Post  chel_calvelo on Thu 21 Oct 2010, 6:08 pm

    That was a good discussion!. You have related the article to your experience. If that was the real reason of your supervisors, I think they are not eligible to be called as “authentic leaders”. So be happy and proud because you’re not one of them!. =P

    I think the article is just a derivation/combination of a new perspective and basic leadership styles. This emerging theory was out of the creative minds of Wong and Cumming in order to find its relevance to the advancement of nursing leadership practice and research in the current time. It merely focuses on the positive traits/strengths of both the leader and followers. It should also address the weaknesses to make it more realistic. Authentic Leadership was clearly defined but some of its concepts are difficult to measure like the self-awareness.

    Maybe they don’t have the guts to be a leader even though they have the said characteristics, traits, values, etc. They think they will not be effective enough to bring about change and influence others to attain goal for the common good. Taking risk is an important factor!.

    “Authentic leaders know who they are.” I believe in this quotation because you are the only one who knows the real you than anyone else. You have the ability to self-explore on what you really want in life.
    tongue Rolling Eyes
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    Post  AntonJayTan on Thu 21 Oct 2010, 3:19 pm

    The title of your article really caught my attention. Not all may know naruto or even hokage. Very Happy For my reply to your questions, I believe that authentic leaders know their own self. Before becoming a good leader one must know his own strengths and weaknesses to become effective.
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    Post  edliwag on Thu 21 Oct 2010, 10:51 am

    I empathize with you especially your feelings towards our so called leaders who by the word itself and title given them should possess the qualities that we should be looking up to and not hating. crab mantality is a stigma that destroys hope of having ever achieving harmony and balance in our lives. loss of confidence, hope and lack of trust is probbaly the answer to your question on why some people are afraid to take charge. Thay feel that the chances of them having a positive influence on someone and making a difference in the world they live in just dont stand a chance with the kind of leaders they have. the authentic model presented by Wong and Cummings focuses on these aspects of leader-follower relationship precisely because trust is very essential to any relationship,The major concepts presented in the model: Self awareness, transparency, balnced processing and authentic beahvior hopes to bridge that gap that is preventing change to take place in the health crae system. People look to leaders for inspiration and direction and if the leaders cannot provide them , the losers are not the clients alone but the leaders and followers as well.

    Many Authors have acknowledged that the core of leadership is relationships(Cummings, 2004). Moreover, recent nursing resarch findings have shown that a positive relational orientation of nurse leaders ameliorated the emotional exhaustion of nurses and resulted in greater satisfaction with supervision and their work. ( Cummings et al, 2005)
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    Post  khayee_07 on Thu 21 Oct 2010, 12:57 am



    Laughing Laughing
    i was struck by your title! Laughing Laughing funny, 'cause i don't know if my thoughts coincide with yours! Laughing is this "HOKAGE" thingy your trying to convey is the one in NARUTO??? confused Laughing Laughing

    if that's the case, i can hardly remember in anyway if i was able to pay attention with the system of leadership of HOKAGE's! Laughing i was more concern with the techniques of the characters since most of the conversations of the leaders and the narration of the precedents bored me a lot... Very Happy

    anyhow, with regards to the literature we've read, i find it really interesting; although i am quite confused of how to really explicate and find meaning on the current status of leadership in our country in relation with the readings re authentic leadership... truly no definite authentic leaders remain as based from our experience and from the criteria given, but don't we have too much terminologies, or should i say expectations from a leader of how to be a good one, providing us nothing but merely disappointments at the end?

    many are afraid to take charge maybe because of their perception of the serious consequences and responsibilities of becoming a leader..., and maybe, just maybe..., only the people who have perceived the nature and realness of becoming a leader think this way..., and that within them, they knew they will not be an effective ones...MAYBE... What a Face

    i think whether you're a leader or not, you know who you are... conflicts only arise on how you make your actions in relation with your personality; you may act objectively or subjectively, but silently you know from within what you truly feel and why you're doing such action... Rolling Eyes
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    Post  PriNcE RJ on Wed 20 Oct 2010, 11:34 pm

    Remember the Hokage...
    By: Robert John C. Napoles

    "Leadership is ultimately about creating a way for people to contribute to making something extraordinary happen (Keith, 2007). Authentic Leadership is a process that draws from both positive psychological capacities and a highly developed organizational context, which results in both greater self-awareness and self-regulated positive behaviours on the part of leaders and associates, fostering positive self-development. It requires then, Authentic Leaders, who are persons that are hopeful, optimistic, resilient, and transparent (Hannah et al., 2005).” They operate consistently with values visible to others, focus on ethical or right things to do, take the lead even at personal risk, make the development of others a priority, and work to ensure that their communication is transparent and that others perceive it as intended (Avolio et al., 2004; May et al., 2003). Authenticity is to “know thyself” (Avolio et al., 2004).

    Are they then all “true to themselves?” The Nursing Board, Nurse Theorists, Nurse Researchers, Nurse Scientists, Chief Nurses, Deans of Colleges of Nursing, Nurse Supervisors, Head Nurses, Senior Nurses, Nurse Instructors and members of the Academe, all the Nurses who are given high regards with their positions in the nursing strata and their contributions to Nursing, Nursing Education, Health Care Delivery System, Mankind, and the World as a whole, those who are deemed as Crusaders of caring and statures of health promotion and disease prevention, the acclaimed Nursing Leaders.

    This discussion wouldn’t want to wander away to other foreign places. The Philippine’s Nursing System is a substantial ground to draw out numerous leadership issues from. Enough with all the decency and all that is ideal, and enough with all the discussion on Carol Wong and Greta Cumming’s “Authentic Leadership” literature, we’ve all read it I presume. Nursing Politics, Crab mentality, Red Tape, Hunger-for-Power, and many other strong negative words encapsulate the country’s nursing leaders of today. Being a Staff Nurse in a secondary, applying for tertiary level, private hospital, the writer shares his story and some of his inquiries: “I started my professional nursing career, after six long months of waiting at home, in this hospital that I never heard of until the moment that I saw it in the midst of my journey in search for job-openings. When I was a Nurse-trainee, I worked genuinely hard to accumulate a lot of clinical experience, divulge on clinical nursing knowledge, and shine my brightest. My utmost goal was to satisfy all the senior nurses and supervisors who evaluated my performance so that I could grab that one glorious opportunity to have a job, especially when hundreds of thousands of registered nurses have none. The way to Valhalla as a senior staff nurse was awe-excitingly incommodious! A lot of clinical as well as clerical skills where tested before I was “crowned” to be a regular staff nurse while others continued on renewing their contracts every six months. The burnout started when my position at work became stable. I started wanting changes; changes that I thought would benefit the nursing staffs. I decided to start to enhance myself, by this, I’m talking about my decision on taking my masteral degree in nursing. Thinking that it would be polite to inform the Clinical Supervisor and Nursing Service Supervisor about my plan, and so that they could give me a fit duty schedule when I start schooling, I had a dialogue with them and submitted formal letters to humbly ask for their official approval. The day after submitting the papers they required of me, I received a phone call from the Nursing Service Supervisor informing me that they decided not to approve my request. At first I thought that they knew best. But then I started hearing from other ward supervisors, head nurses and other senior nurses that my request was not approved because the Clinical Supervisor and Nursing Service Supervisor wanted no other staff nurse in the hospital to be entitled as master besides them. It maybe factual or just a gossip, but it’s not hard to take into consideration that insecurity has influenced their decision. Are these supervisors authentic leaders? It’s contrary to the definition of an authentic leader as a person who makes the development of others a priority (Avolio et al., 2004). I’m sure that in other hospital settings, other nurses are experiencing the same unfair treatment. The situations may differ, but true-to-the-fact, a lot of nursing leaders wants to preserve their positions and if ever they share their prestige, they lend it to people closely related with them and most unlikely to people who deserve them better.” The litany of problems is all too familiar. What's nowhere to be found, however or almost nowhere, is the leadership needed to fix things. The problem isn't the lack of potential leaders, however, but a wrongheaded notion of what exactly a leader is. This misguided notion of leadership often results in the wrong people attaining critical leadership roles (George B., 2006).

    The promulgation of authentic leadership, for me, is not anymore a harangue but a reminder and an admonition to all who perceive having and those who have leadership roles not only in nursing but in all professions. It is like a mirror that tries to reflect what an ideal herald or dignitary should be inside and out. A lot of leaders and potential leaders are forgetting this. Authenticity must pervade everything that you do (Chapman J., 2009). Authentic leaders know the "true north" of their moral compass and are prepared to stay the course despite challenges and disappointments. They are more concerned about serving others than they are about their own success or recognition. Which is not to say that authentic leaders are perfect. Every leader has weaknesses, and all are subject to human frailties and mistakes. Yet by acknowledging failings and admitting error, they connect with people and empower them to take risks (George B., 2006). All of us have the spark of leadership in us, whether it is in business, in government, or as a non-profit volunteer. The challenge is to understand ourselves well enough to discover where we can use our leadership gifts to serve others (Fudge A., 2006).



    References:
    1. Kouzes J., and Posner B. (2007). The Leadership Challenge. CA: Jossey Bass.
    2. Champy J. (Fall 2009). Leader to Leader. Vol. 2009 Issue 54, p39-44, 6p, 1 Black and White Photograph
    3. George B. (2006). Truly Authentic Leadership. U.S. News & World Report, 00415537, 10/30/2006, Vol. 141, Issue 16



    “Discussion is an exchange of knowledge; an argument an exchange of ignorance.” – Robert Quillen
    The writer king wants to “discuss” with you then, your take on this reaction paper utilizing these guide questions:
    1. Kindly share your most concise thought about Carol Wong and Greta Cumming’s “Authentic Leadership” Literature.
    2. There are leaders throughout organizations just waiting for the opportunity. In too many organizations, however, people don't feel empowered to take charge. Why do you think so?
    3. “Authentic leaders know who they are.” Do you believe this quotation? Whether your answer is yes or no, please render us your thought.
    4. By any chance, have you noticed the title of this paper? Why do you think this has been entitled as such?

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      Current date/time is Thu 17 Oct 2019, 4:14 pm