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    HOW WOULD SOCRATES TEACH GAMES? A CONSTRUCTIVIST APPROACH

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    joyhn

    Posts : 14
    Join date : 2009-06-21

    HOW WOULD SOCRATES TEACH GAMES? A CONSTRUCTIVIST APPROACH

    Post  joyhn on Tue 06 Apr 2010, 7:59 am

    University of the East
    Ramon Magsaysay Memorial Medical Center, Inc.
    GRADUATE SCHOOL
    Aurora Boulevard, Quezon City

    Alvares, Efren Jr. F.
    Facto, Christian Jay J.
    Monterozo, Mary Lynn R.
    Nidar, Joy H.


    HOW WOULD SOCRATES TEACH GAMES? A CONSTRUCTIVIST APPROACH
    Butler, J. (1997)

    The thought of teaching for understanding is certainly an essential concept that should be the basis for teachers’ method of teaching.

    In the article, Butler noted that traditional skills based method still inadequate for the students to have a complete understanding of the games that they were playing. Thus, Socratic method of teaching and learning was utilized to exhibit a more effective style of teaching games.

    Socratic method involved series of questions and answers to gain a better and accurate understanding of an area of interest. However, there were answers which may be too narrow, too restricted, biased and uninformed that would simply produce more questions through the teacher’s guidance. Furthermore, it is important to understand that one’s understanding of a subject is never final or absolute. An unforeseen question could come up at any time, and the process could start all over again; this is the beauty of critical thinking. (Coleman)

    Due to mentioned limitations, Butler attempted to provide a system called Teaching Games for Understanding or TGfU that can be applied to games in order to help students gain a complete understanding of the games that they play.

    As cited by Forrest, Webb & Pearson, (2006) Teaching Games for Understanding were games based didactic model intended at generating greater understanding of all aspects of games, while increasing activity levels, engagement, motivation and enjoyment in physical education lessons. In this system students were asked to categorize games based on their components, such as Target, Striking, Net/Wall, and Territorial. Webb & Pearson, (2008) also pointed out that teachers need to have a good understanding of the categories and sports and activities to be able to analyze them. Moreover, they also need to understand the questioning technique wherein it was often used to enhance the teaching of games utilizing the said system. It needs to be planned and specific to the outcomes that the teacher requires from the participants.

    Buttler, J. (1997) believed that the TGfU method is beneficial and superior to the traditional skills approach. In addition, Webb, Pearson & McKeen (2005) supported that compared to traditional teaching of games, the increased enjoyment of students exposed to the TGfU approach. In contrast, evidence of the superiority of one approach over the other in regard to game performance has been inconclusive. (Gréhaighne, Richard and Griffin, 2005) and it was found no significant difference in the areas measured between the groups using either method. (Harrison, Blakemore et al 2004)


    Guide Questions:
    1. In what ways can the Socratic Method be used in the nursing education and nursing profession?
    2. What are the benefits and limitations of the Teaching Games for Understanding?






    References:
    1. Pearson, P. & Webb, P. (2008). An Integrated Approach to Teaching Games for Understanding (TGfU). University of Wollongong Faculty of Education – Papers. pp. 1-9. Retrieved April 5, 2010

    2. Pearson, P. & Webb, P. (2008). Developing Effective Questioning in Teaching Games for Understanding (TGfU). University of Wollongong Faculty of Education – Papers. pp. 1-9. Retrieved April 5, 2010

    3. Forrest, G., Webb, P. & Pearson, P. (2006). Games For Understanding in Pre Service Teacher
    Education: A ‘Game for Outcome’ Approach for Enhanced Understanding of Games. University of Wollongong. pp. 32-44. Retrieved April 5, 2010
    avatar
    melissa.juco

    Posts : 20
    Join date : 2009-06-21
    Age : 32
    Location : Quezon City, Philippines

    Re: HOW WOULD SOCRATES TEACH GAMES? A CONSTRUCTIVIST APPROACH

    Post  melissa.juco on Tue 06 Apr 2010, 2:20 pm

    "HOW WOULD SOCRATES TEACH GAMES? A CONSTRUCTIVIST APPROACH"
    Butler, J. (1997)



    Journal Response by:
    JUCO, Melissa Frances R.
    MANANQUIL, Ann Marby
    MARASIGAN, Iza Therese C.
    MEDALLA, Jerrick
    MELICOR, Abigail




    ~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~



    1.) In what ways can the Socratic Method be used in the nursing education and nursing profession?

    The Socratic method involves a series of questions and answers which leads to the opening of scenarios or quotes to make the material relevant, and would draw the reader in.

    In nursing education, this strategy is used as an assessment tool in identifying learning needs and at the same time excluding the presence of barriers to learning (Habel, M. 2005). Furthermore, this method also helps develop questions to evaluate the students' critical thinking in a discussion by forming connections among ideas using its two phases namely [1] systematic questioning and [2] drawing comparisons (Oermann, M. et al 2009). The two phases attempts to achieve one common goal and that is to arouse the students' curiosity and independence to think and form ideas on their own, and according to Sedlak & Doheny (20004) provide a logical, stepwise guide to assist students in understanding a complex topic or issue.

    It is suggested that this type of teaching be carried out while the professor leads the discussion with carefully thought-out / logically sequenced questions aimed at his students to construct better analysis, examine alternate points of view, and draw generalizations across different content areas (Oermann, M. et al 2009).

    Moreover, we would like to note some examples of techniques wherein the Socratic Method can be fully utilized. There are several 'game plans' explained by authors Marilyn Oermann and Kathleen Gaberson in their book entitled "Evaluation and Testing in Nursing Education" (2009). The line of questioning may take form in a Debate where alternative points of view are considered, through Multimedia by presenting a scenario for evaluating higher form of learning, and through Shot Written Assignments that provide students with the opportunity to express their critical thinking through writing.

    In the clinical practice, one of the most popular and most commonly used types of learning associated with this technique is in the form of case studies. Case Studies evaluate the ability to solve patient and setting-related problems through the nurses' decisions about problems, solutions and possible alternative approaches (Oermann, M. et al 2009) and how the nurse was able to identify the best and most emergent response or care in a particular situation.

    Indeed, through the Socratic Method, critical and reflective thinking are valued by the students more rather than mere memorization of content. Therefore, a much deeper learning and understanding about the subject can be fostered.




    ----------------------

    * REFERENCES:

    1.) Habel M.( 2005). Getting Your Message Across: Patient Teaching. Retrieved on April 6, 2010

    2.) Oermann, M. and Gaberson, K. (2009). Evaluation and Testing in Nursing Education. Retrieved on April 6, 2010


    Last edited by melissa.juco on Tue 06 Apr 2010, 3:04 pm; edited 1 time in total
    avatar
    melissa.juco

    Posts : 20
    Join date : 2009-06-21
    Age : 32
    Location : Quezon City, Philippines

    Re: HOW WOULD SOCRATES TEACH GAMES? A CONSTRUCTIVIST APPROACH

    Post  melissa.juco on Tue 06 Apr 2010, 2:39 pm

    Figure 1 (Taken from Thorpe, R. et al's "Rethinking Games Teaching". 2000)





    ------------------------------------------



    QUESTION for the GROUP/CLASS:

    How can the "Teaching Games for Understanding (TGfU)" technique be applied to the education of nursing students when it comes to skill execution and demonstration? Kindly illustrate or provide us a simple / brief description of the process.

    krisna

    Posts : 12
    Join date : 2009-06-20

    RE: HOW WOULD SOCRATES TEACH GAMES? A CONSTRUCTIVIST APROACH

    Post  krisna on Tue 06 Apr 2010, 3:26 pm

    GROUP 2:
    DAGUASI, CLIFF RICHARD
    LACANILAO, FATIMA GRACE
    LUIS, MARY ANN KRISNA
    MAPATAC, TOMAS III
    REYES, MA. MARTELL

    A learner is often curious and will always try to seek numerous answers in a particular question. Applying the Socratic Method assists the learner’s analytical and thinking ability (Oermann and Gabersoon 2009). For example, formulating questions about anatomy and physiology, pharmacology, and pathophysiology to a nursing specialty can enhance a learner’s knowledge in a specific area of nursing study. It also aims to assist a learner to make different generalizations while understanding a complex topic and applying it in different clinical situations.

    On the other hand, applying the Teaching Games for Understanding encourages a learner to participate in a competitive activity that will improve his/her skills about the different concepts and strategies covered in a particular game. In this way, the learner develops a better understanding of the game which can lead to improvement in psychomotor and decision making skills and at the same time stimulates enthusiasm.

    Both teaching method—Socratic and Teaching Games for Understanding present different sets of ideas to improve the quality of teaching and learning. Each aim is designed to target the level of knowledge and skill of the learner. If these two teaching methods are combined, it will attempt to incorporate cognitive and psychomotor domain to achieve a balanced learning.

    Reference:
    Oermann, M.H. and Gabersoon, K.B. (2009). Evaluation and Testing in Nursing Education 3rd ed. New York: Springer Publishing Company.

    joyhn

    Posts : 14
    Join date : 2009-06-21

    Re: HOW WOULD SOCRATES TEACH GAMES? A CONSTRUCTIVIST APPROACH

    Post  joyhn on Tue 06 Apr 2010, 5:00 pm

    melissa.juco wrote:
    "HOW WOULD SOCRATES TEACH GAMES? A CONSTRUCTIVIST APPROACH"
    Butler, J. (1997)



    Journal Response by:
    JUCO, Melissa Frances R.
    MANANQUIL, Ann Marby
    MARASIGAN, Iza Therese C.
    MEDALLA, Jerrick
    MELICOR, Abigail




    ~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~



    1.) In what ways can the Socratic Method be used in the nursing education and nursing profession?

    The Socratic method involves a series of questions and answers which leads to the opening of scenarios or quotes to make the material relevant, and would draw the reader in.

    In nursing education, this strategy is used as an assessment tool in identifying learning needs and at the same time excluding the presence of barriers to learning (Habel, M. 2005). Furthermore, this method also helps develop questions to evaluate the students' critical thinking in a discussion by forming connections among ideas using its two phases namely [1] systematic questioning and [2] drawing comparisons (Oermann, M. et al 2009). The two phases attempts to achieve one common goal and that is to arouse the students' curiosity and independence to think and form ideas on their own, and according to Sedlak & Doheny (20004) provide a logical, stepwise guide to assist students in understanding a complex topic or issue.

    It is suggested that this type of teaching be carried out while the professor leads the discussion with carefully thought-out / logically sequenced questions aimed at his students to construct better analysis, examine alternate points of view, and draw generalizations across different content areas (Oermann, M. et al 2009).

    Moreover, we would like to note some examples of techniques wherein the Socratic Method can be fully utilized. There are several 'game plans' explained by authors Marilyn Oermann and Kathleen Gaberson in their book entitled "Evaluation and Testing in Nursing Education" (2009). The line of questioning may take form in a Debate where alternative points of view are considered, through Multimedia by presenting a scenario for evaluating higher form of learning, and through Shot Written Assignments that provide students with the opportunity to express their critical thinking through writing.

    In the clinical practice, one of the most popular and most commonly used types of learning associated with this technique is in the form of case studies. Case Studies evaluate the ability to solve patient and setting-related problems through the nurses' decisions about problems, solutions and possible alternative approaches (Oermann, M. et al 2009) and how the nurse was able to identify the best and most emergent response or care in a particular situation.

    Indeed, through the Socratic Method, critical and reflective thinking are valued by the students more rather than mere memorization of content. Therefore, a much deeper learning and understanding about the subject can be fostered.




    ----------------------

    * REFERENCES:

    1.) Habel M.( 2005). Getting Your Message Across: Patient Teaching. Retrieved on April 6, 2010

    2.) Oermann, M. and Gaberson, K. (2009). Evaluation and Testing in Nursing Education. Retrieved on April 6, 2010


    That is correct. In a classroom scenario, a student may not even realize that the professor is using this kind of method in their discussion. Instead of drawing the pace of the discussion from books, the professor can get it from the students themselves. Of course, to keep the discussion on a constant flow the students are expected to have a level of understanding of the topic. That sort of activity not only challenges the critical thinking skills of students but may also help in the retainment of information from the discussion.

    ochona

    Posts : 4
    Join date : 2010-04-06

    Re: HOW WOULD SOCRATES TEACH GAMES? A CONSTRUCTIVIST APPROACH

    Post  ochona on Tue 06 Apr 2010, 5:06 pm

    Group 1
    Castellano, Katrina
    Gonzales, Charise
    Galvez, Marge
    Ochona, Zacchari andrei


    There are different styles and approaches on how a person or a student would learn. Certainly, they do not master a skill in a uniform pace. According to Kenneth Moore (2005), basic to any teaching strategy is its motivational value. Simulations and games appear to be quite effective as motivational tools. However, several limitations have also been voiced about this approach such as relationships between the teacher and students being too informal leading to management prolems. Limitations that would arise, could be proper planning.

    In TGfU, according to Hopper T & Kruisselbrink D (2002), approach will be from skill & tactical progression perspectives. Skill acquisition theories of information processing and dynamic systems to show how tactical & skill focused approaches influence learning. Games teaching are according to integration of skills & tactics in a TGfU approach. Strean & Holt's (2000) research on the other hand, emphasize that children, parents and trainors acknowledge games & game-like situations were more fun than technically oriented drills.

    In recent study by Kirk & MacPhail (2002), offers TGfU model from a situated learning perspective. They focused on learning theory more on the active engagement of the learner with the environment, & through perception & decision-making how the
    learner adapts new knowledge to fit what they already know. Making the teacher more focused on the prior knowledge of individuals, such as TV viewing and related sports,to frame learning experiences. The Griffin & Placek (2001) monograph mentions how TGfU affects student learning. This gives promising insights from collaborative research between researchers from motor learning and sport s pedagogy. They emphasized the interplay between individual’s prior knowledge, the individual and the environment created by the teacher.

    Teaching games for understanding encourage students to perform well and make better decision due to having fun while learning. TgfU can be utilize to nursing students by developing question that will enhance and develop the critical thinking of the students. The use of questioning is a powerful method of encouraging players or students to analyze their actions, both individually, and as a team (Pearson 2005). With this model teachers must determine what key points to deal with and in what area the students are having difficulty so that the games can be modified and be effective in learning.

    "I hear and I forgot, I see and I remember, I do and I understand" - confucius





    Source:

    Moore, K. (2005). Effective Instructional Strategies: From theory to Practice. Sage Publications Inc.Thousand Oaks California 91320. pp.272-273.

    Griffin, L., & Placek, J. (2001). The understanding and development of learners' domain-
    specific knowledge. Journal o f Teaching Physical Education [monograph], 20(4),
    299-422.

    Hopper T, Kruisselbrink D (2002) Teaching Games for Understanding: What does it look like and how does it influence student skill learning and game performance? AVANTE, July 2002.

    Kirk, D., & MacPhail, A. (2002). Teaching games for understanding and situated
    learning: Rethinking the Bunker-Thorpe model. Journal of Teaching in Physical
    Education, 21, 177-192.

    Strean, W., & Holt, N. (2000). Players', coaches', and parents' perceptions of fun in youth
    sport. AVANTE, 6, 84-98.

    Pearson, P. and Webb, P. (2008) developing effective questioning in teaching games for understanding(TGfU). A paper presented at the 1st Asia Pacific Sport in Education Conference,
    Adelaide, 2008.

    lynnmonterozo

    Posts : 14
    Join date : 2009-06-21

    Re:

    Post  lynnmonterozo on Tue 06 Apr 2010, 5:17 pm

    Alvarez, Efren Jr
    Facto, Christian Jay
    Monterozo, Mary Lynn
    Nidar, Joy

    What are the benefits and limitations of the Teaching Games for Understanding?


    Numerous researches revealed that Teaching Games for Understanding (TGfU) was one of the major approaches to the quality teaching of games. Light (2002) emphasized that engagement and cognitive learning thru TGfU approach has been effective. It was also suggested that assisting teachers and coaches might address the issue of having some difficulty in terms of cognition in games. Meanwhile, Pearson, Webb & McKeen (2005) added that utilizing TGfU approach improved learning outcomes for students which can contribute to the awareness during play and made better decisions as well.

    Other benefits of teaching games for understanding that were stated in the critique made by Coleman include (1)more time was spent facilitating student learning and challenging students to give questions (2)less time was spent on controlling and managing the class and (3) TGfU method allows a teacher to student; student to teacher communication.

    References:
    1. Pearson, P. & Webb, P. (2008). An Integrated Approach to Teaching Games for Understanding (TGfU). University of Wollongong Faculty of Education – Papers. pp. 1-9. Retrieved April 5, 2010

    Efren F. Alvarez Jr.

    Posts : 13
    Join date : 2009-06-21
    Location : Lipa City, Batangas

    Re: HOW WOULD SOCRATES TEACH GAMES? A CONSTRUCTIVIST APPROACH

    Post  Efren F. Alvarez Jr. on Tue 06 Apr 2010, 5:25 pm

    krisna wrote:GROUP 2:
    DAGUASI, CLIFF RICHARD
    LACANILAO, FATIMA GRACE
    LUIS, MARY ANN KRISNA
    MAPATAC, TOMAS III
    REYES, MA. MARTELL

    A learner is often curious and will always try to seek numerous answers in a particular question. Applying the Socratic Method assists the learner’s analytical and thinking ability (Oermann and Gabersoon 2009). For example, formulating questions about anatomy and physiology, pharmacology, and pathophysiology to a nursing specialty can enhance a learner’s knowledge in a specific area of nursing study. It also aims to assist a learner to make different generalizations while understanding a complex topic and applying it in different clinical situations.

    On the other hand, applying the Teaching Games for Understanding encourages a learner to participate in a competitive activity that will improve his/her skills about the different concepts and strategies covered in a particular game. In this way, the learner develops a better understanding of the game which can lead to improvement in psychomotor and decision making skills and at the same time stimulates enthusiasm.

    Both teaching method—Socratic and Teaching Games for Understanding present different sets of ideas to improve the quality of teaching and learning. Each aim is designed to target the level of knowledge and skill of the learner. If these two teaching methods are combined, it will attempt to incorporate cognitive and psychomotor domain to achieve a balanced learning.

    Reference:
    Oermann, M.H. and Gabersoon, K.B. (2009). Evaluation and Testing in Nursing Education 3rd ed. New York: Springer Publishing Company.


    GROUP 5

    Alvarez, Efren Jr. F.
    Facto, Christian Jay J.
    Monterozo, Mary Lynn R.
    Nidar, Joy H.


    Yes, including games as an alternative way of teaching had a great advantage especially when the class and the topics are boring. To get the attention of the listeners, different teaching styles are very essential. Others can also use some ideas in television games and use questions that are suited on the topic.

    aldrinvallarta

    Posts : 4
    Join date : 2010-04-06

    Re: HOW WOULD SOCRATES TEACH GAMES? A CONSTRUCTIVIST APPROACH

    Post  aldrinvallarta on Tue 06 Apr 2010, 5:31 pm

    University of the East
    Ramon Magsaysay Memorial Medical Center, Inc.
    64 Aurora Boulevard, Brgy. Dona Imelda, Quezon City




    Aquino, Felix
    Magdael, Rutchelle Kaye
    Sarmiento, Noel
    Vallarta, Aldrin Vincent

    HOW WOULD SOCRATES TEACH GAMES? A CONSTRUCTIVIST APPROACH
    Butler, J. (1997)

    The article discusses Socratic Method and how it becomes a basis of TGfU as a teaching method in providing complete understanding of students in the games that they are playing. It argues that TGFU method is more beneficial compared to the traditional skills approach. Butler (1997) presents benefits of TGFU from different studies. TGFU provides a complete and greater understanding of the games, skills, and how they relate was reached. Time is spent more on facilitating student learning and challenging students with questions. Also, time is less spent in controlling and managing the class. In terms of communication, TGFU method allows for teacher to student, student to student, and finally, student to teacher communication.

    However, in relation with nursing education, it can be observed that traditional skills based approach is used in teaching nursing skills. In traditional nursing skills classroom, the instructor lectures about theory and rationale for particular skills. Through this, the instructor provides complete understanding of what is the nursing skill is and why it is need to be done. Then after explanation is done, a skill is demonstrated (by faculty or instructional media) and students then practice the skill with feedback from faculty (Salyers, 2007). After practicing the skill, each student is required to perform a return demonstration. The return demonstration serves as an evaluation. If the skill is demonstrated at an acceptable level of proficiency, the student is allowed to perform the procedure in the clinical area and begin learning a new skill. The nursing students should be prepared enough to execute nursing procedures in clinical setting because minimal mistake might harm their patient.

    Although TGfU is a more fun learning experience for most students, the preparation to conduct such activity serves as a hindrance for most instructors to come up with a plan that would motivate student to learn. With this, trainings on leadership and management skills should be offered to lecturers to further enhance their teaching skills to caught the attention of the students that would lead to a positive outcome not only to the intellectual capabilities of the students but also on their camaraderie with their fellow colleagues and professor.

    References:

    Coleman, C. (2004). Critique on how would Socrates teach games?
    A Constructivist Approach. Retrieved on April 6, 2010 athttp://www.educ.uvic.ca/faculty /thopper /tactic/articles/socrates_teach_games.htm

    Salyers,V. (2007) Psychomotor skills using a web-enhanced format. International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship, Vol. 4 [2007], Iss. 1, Art. 1. Retrieved on April 6, 2010 at http://works.bepress.com/cgi /viewcontent .cgi ?article=1007&context=dr_vincent_salyers

    Allison, S. (1997). Two different approaches to teaching within PE. Teacher Research Grant Scheme. Retrieved on April 6, 2010 at www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/ntrp/lib/pdf/teachingpe.pdf

    camille.aquino

    Posts : 2
    Join date : 2009-06-21
    Location : Marikina City

    How Would Socrates Teach Games? A Constructivist Approach

    Post  camille.aquino on Tue 06 Apr 2010, 5:55 pm

    GROUP 4

    AQUINO, CAMILLE
    FADERA, CARLO
    JAMOLANGUE, ARNEL
    LACISTE, CHLOE

    According to Piaget, a human person undergoes several stages of cognitive development, wherein one has the ability to think and process ideas dependent to whichever stage he belongs. A 7-year old thinks and interprets a thing differently, as compared to a 15-year old. Hence, the manner of teaching in these two age groups varies from one another.
    Socratic teaching is intended for those in the formal operations stage of Piaget. It is focused on the use and development of the critical thinking ability of its learners. Teaching through questioning is its attack to generate ideas and to gain understanding of the concepts being taught. Thus, nursing education is patterned in this approach.
    One of the methods of learning different cases and situations of patients is problem-based learning. In this approach, students aim to solve the problems presented of the given subject. Through this, it pushes the students to come up with solutions to the given problems based on what they have read from their books; from the lectures they have attended; and from their experiences related to the said problem. It is a way wherein the students actively participate with the problem solving, and learn from the ideas of their fellow students as well. It also serves as a re-validation of prior knowledge of the students that is in contradiction to what is deemed to be right.
    The use of technology as well uses the Socratic approach. The utilization of e-learning activities, through synchronous and asynchronous classes, are examples of these. The posting of students of their reactions and ideas coming from the resources they have gathered, are analyses of the previous posts. It is a way to assess a person’s thinking and learning ability through the postings rendered. Through this, it serves a double purpose of determining the actual level of understanding, whether higher or lower order; and inducing the students thinking, exceeding its normal capacity. Hence, the students get to be motivated to engage in more learning activities to acquire more insight that will deepen their knowledge bank.
    Another teaching approach is suggested by Stevens and Brenner called Peer active learning approach (PALS)-an active learning pedagogies in clinical education that opposes didactic teaching approach that foster more habitual concrete thinking rather than critical thinking. Teaching approach is more applicable in undergraduate nursing students having their intensive related learning experience in hospital. It enhances motivation, critical thinking skills and nursing diagnoses formulation. Advantages are it deepens learning experience, create good milieu for class interaction and promotes retention of knowledge.

    REFERENCES:
    Stevens, J. and Brenner, S. (2009). The Peer Active Learning Approach for Clinical Education. A Pilot Study. Journal of Theory Construction and Testing, 13 (2): 51-56 retrieved April 5, 2010 from CINAHL database.
    MacVicar, R. (2003). Canada’s Practice-based Small Group Learning Program: An Innovative Approach to Continuing Professional Development. Education for Primary Care, November; 14 (4): 431-9. Retrieved April 6, 2010 from CINAHL database.
    Whitely, T. (2006). Using the Socratic Method and Bloom’s Taxonomy of the Cognitive Domain to Enhance Online Discussion, Critical Thinking, and Student Learning. Developments in Business Stimulation and Experiential Learning, Vol. 33. Retrieved April 6, 2010 from CINAHL database.
    Dochy, F. et al (2003). Effects of Problem-Based Learning: a meta-analysis. Learning and Instruction, Vol 13, 533-568. Retrieved April 6, 2010 from Elsevier database.


    Last edited by camille.aquino on Tue 06 Apr 2010, 5:57 pm; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : GROUP NAMES)

    joyhn

    Posts : 14
    Join date : 2009-06-21

    Re: HOW WOULD SOCRATES TEACH GAMES? A CONSTRUCTIVIST APPROACH

    Post  joyhn on Tue 06 Apr 2010, 5:56 pm

    melissa.juco wrote:
    Figure 1 (Taken from Thorpe, R. et al's "Rethinking Games Teaching". 2000)





    ------------------------------------------



    QUESTION for the GROUP/CLASS:

    How can the "Teaching Games for Understanding (TGfU)" technique be applied to the education of nursing students when it comes to skill execution and demonstration? Kindly illustrate or provide us a simple / brief description of the process.

    A lot of research is needed for a form of TGfU for the nursing education primarily focusing on skill execution and demonstration. Royse and Newton (2007) consider games as an innovation in teaching strategy for nursing but there is a lacking in the empirical evidence to support advantages of the technique. In other researches on this area, the evaluation for the effectiveness of games is done by scores in the posttest (compared to pretest).
    I can only assume that it can be applied thru forming return demos into games or have the games before the actual return demonstration. It lessens the pressure in doing the actual return demo and adds fun in practicing the skill.


    Reference

    ROYSE, M. and NEWTON, S. (2007). How GAMING Is Used as an Innovative Strategy FOR Nursing Education. Nursing Education Perspectives: Vol. 28, No. 5, pp. 263-267.

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